Sessions / Technology / CALL / MALL

Sign up for a Tech Clinic with Joe Dale #1171


Thu, Feb 18, 09:00-Wed, Feb 24, 23:55 JST | Signup for Joe Dale's Tech Clinics

We are delighted to announce that Joe Dale, an edtech specialist based in the UK, will be leading a number of tech clinics during KOTESOL 2021!

Joe’s sessions will be focused around any edtech questions and issues you are having, both in general and specifically during the pandemic. If you are interested in attending one of Joe’s clinics, we invite you to send in your questions, and he will suggest some practical solutions that should help to improve your practice. His considerable experience in this area means that he will be able to provide quality, substantive advice — and if he doesn't know the answer straight away, he'll find it! These sessions will last for 90 minutes and will be custom-tailored to each group. They will also be small sessions, with attendance capped at 20. (Note: For sessions to run on Thursday and Friday, there needs to be a minimum of 10 participants.) You may sign up for a maximum of 2 sessions.

*** Session Timetable (20 people max. per session) ***

Monday, February 22 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

Tuesday, February 23 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

Wednesday, February 24 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

* Thursday, February 25 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

* Friday, February 26 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

* The Thursday and Friday clinics will be cancelled unless 10+ people register by Wednesday night (11:55 p.m. KST on Feb. 24)!

Registration and question submission can be done via an electronic form embedded in the location here.

Teaching a Foreign Language with Computational Thinking #1043


Sat, Feb 20, 09:30-10:10 JST | Room EK

This presentation aims to demonstrate how to use Scratch as a tool to teach students a foreign language while enabling them to develop computational thinking. As this workshop is designed for practitioners who do not have any prior knowledge about coding and computer science, workshop participants are expected to practice Scratch activities created by the presenter to get familiar with the block-based programming tool and functions during this workshop. Participants will come away with ideas to create their own Scratch lessons while practicing with the given examples. Since Scratch was developed for children, K-12 instructors are welcome to join this session.

Online Classes: Surviving and Thriving in 2021 #1061


Sat, Feb 20, 15:30-18:00 JST | KOTESOL Room

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, online teaching has moved from a position of tenuous acceptance and application into standard practice across the world. From parents to students to educators, everyone has undoubtedly struggled with this shift. In this panel, members of the Multimedia and CALL Special Interest Group (MCALL-SIG) as well as two invited speakers will review positive and negative experiences with online teaching; discuss the challenges of converting standardized offline classes to online classes; explore strategies to adapt offline teaching practices to online classes; and share insights into what it takes to succeed in education today.

The panel will also be prepared to engage with audience members on specific questions related to online education, using technology in their classes, and solutions and resources to assist educators with tech-related issues in their respective classrooms. Attendees will leave with a renewed perspective on online teaching as well as practical solutions to the challenges of teaching offline courses in an online setting.

Scratch Coding Workshop Through Design-Based Research #1163


Sat, Feb 20, 15:30-18:00 JST | Main Stage

This presentation aims to introduce the features of design-based research and an example design-based research project that was designed by the presenter. The example research project is about digital storytelling activities through Scratch to teach students both computational skills and a foreign language. The rationale for the Scratch coding workshop research project and research designs will be presented with literature reviews. Participants will come away with ideas of how to create design-based research while exploring the example project in the presentation.

*** Part of the Graduate Student Showcase; this presentation, itself, is ~25 minutes long. ***

Example of a Communicative Lesson for a Mixed-Ability Online English Literature Class #1164


Sat, Feb 20, 15:30-18:00 JST

I developed this 5-lesson plan for the Overseas Educational Institution Portal—Remote Class Materials Contest (재외교육기관포털—원격 수 자료 공모) hosted by Seoul National University and the Korean Ministry of Education. It involves many small steps that are simple enough for students at lower levels (A2+) but that can be extremely expressive and rewarding for advanced students. It takes advantage of technology by utilizing breakout rooms and a variety of applications from Google. In this lesson we’ll be focusing on ekphrastic poetry.

*** Part of the Graduate Student Showcase; this presentation, itself, is ~25 minutes long. ***

Google Education Training (Korean Session / 한국어 세션 ) #1132


Mon, Feb 22, 11:30-16:30 JST

*** NOTE: This session takes place in Google Meet and uses a variety of Google tools. Please make sure you have a Google account before you join! ***

Google Education Group Gyeonggi-do ~ GEG-GG presents

Tools-Tips-and-Tricks for Google-using Educators

What’s your learning objective? There’s definitely a tool to use, a technique to employ, and a fellow teacher who is ready to help you! Welcome to GEG-GG! Our group of highly energetic, engaging educators use Google-based tools to improve as professionals while accomplishing classroom goals. Most importantly, we discuss ways to make the learner have a more memorable, fun, authentic, and rigorous learning experience. Over the course of two days, participants will go through the same sessions that are normally done to become a qualified GCE - Google Certified Educator. We will share experiences and encourage real-time interaction. Participation in these sessions can help prepare you for Level 1 certification. (Gmail, Google Drive, Docs, Slides, Forms, Sheets, Youtube, Google Sites and Google Classroom).

Monday (Korean) 11:30 am - 4:30 pm 1st hour; Lunch~Q&A hour; 3 more sessions / 3 hours: (5 hours total)

Tuesday (English) 11:30 am - 4:30 pm 1st hour; Lunch~Q&A hour; 3 more sessions / 3 hours: (5 hours total)

Hosts and Presenters

Jung Eun "Judy" Kim

Ms. Jung Eun Judy Kim is a founder and a lead researcher in Hands In Hands research center where she develops online learning systems with a focus on communicative language skills, media literacy, digital literacy, digital feedback, digital empathy, and global competence. She has been teaching English communicative language skills and training pre-service and in-service teachers for the last 22 years. Currently her research is focused on the effects of bilingualism on dementia and global education cooperation.

She is the first woman Google Certified Innovator and Trainer in Korea. And she is a Microsoft Innovative Educator Expert. She is a leader of Google Educator Group Gyeonggi. She supports shifts in pedagogy and practice through professional development, training of teachers and educators in K12 and higher education on uptake of new technology, and facilitating conversations and planning between the community, school boards, teachers, administrators, and students. She is also leading a Global educator group with 80 leaders from all over the world to connect and support educators worldwide and make the world a smaller, and better place.

James G. Rush, II

Mr. James G. Rush, II, has been working in South Korea at Luther University since fall of 2016. Beginning in 2017, he became actively involved in events for the local Yongin Chapter and Korea TESOL at the national level. Currently, James is the president of the Yongin Chapter and is part of the International Outreach Committee.

James has taught at all levels from K-to-University and has a masters degree in educational technology. He has lived, worked and instructed in numerous countries, grade-levels and cultural settings. While his position is primarily focused on the use of EFL (English as a Foreign Language), he desires to encourage students to develop as life-long-learners and critical thinkers. As a member of the Google Educator Group-Gyeonggi (GEG-GG), James desires to learn the tools to be considered a certified Google Educator.

Tech Clinic with Joe Dale (Monday) #1134


Mon, Feb 22, 17:00-18:30 JST | Main Stage

We are delighted to announce that Joe Dale, an edtech specialist based in the UK, will be leading a number of tech clinics during KOTESOL 2021!

Joe’s sessions will be focused around any edtech questions and issues you are having, both in general and specifically during the pandemic. If you are interested in attending one of Joe’s clinics, we invite you to send in your questions and he will suggest some practical solutions that should help to improve your practice. His considerable experience in this area (see his bio below) means that he will be able to provide quality, substantive advice — and if he doesn't know the answer straight away, he'll find it!

These sessions will last for 90 minutes, and will be custom-tailored to each group. They will also be small sessions, with attendance capped at 20. For sessions to run there needs to be a minimum of 10 participants. You may sign up for a maximum of 2 sessions.

Session Timetable (subject to minimum sign-up of 10 participants; subject to change)

Monday, February 22 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Tuesday, February 23 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Wednesday, February 24 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Thursday, February 25 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Friday, February 26 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

Registration and question submission will be done via an electronic form that will be accessible shortly.

Google Education Training (English Session) #1133


Tue, Feb 23, 11:30-16:30 JST

*** NOTE: This session takes place in Google Meet and uses a variety of Google tools. Please make sure you have a Google account before you join! ***

Google Education Group Gyeonggi-do ~ GEG-GG presents

Tools-Tips-and-Tricks for Google-using Educators

What’s your learning objective? There’s definitely a tool to use, a technique to employ, and a fellow teacher who is ready to help you! Welcome to GEG-GG! Our group of highly energetic, engaging educators use Google-based tools to improve as professionals while accomplishing classroom goals. Most importantly, we discuss ways to make the learner have a more memorable, fun, authentic, and rigorous learning experience. Over the course of two days, participants will go through the same sessions that are normally done to become a qualified GCE - Google Certified Educator. We will share experiences and encourage real-time interaction. Participation in these sessions can help prepare you for Level 1 certification. (Gmail, Google Drive, Docs, Slides, Forms, Sheets, Youtube, Google Sites and Google Classroom).

Monday (Korean) 11:30 am - 4:30 pm 1st hour; Lunch~Q&A hour; 3 more sessions / 3 hours: (5 hours total)

Tuesday (English) 11:30 am - 4:30 pm 1st hour; Lunch~Q&A hour; 3 more sessions / 3 hours: (5 hours total)

Hosts and Presenters

Jung Eun "Judy" Kim

Ms. Jung Eun Judy Kim is a founder and a lead researcher in Hands In Hands research center where she develops online learning systems with a focus on communicative language skills, media literacy, digital literacy, digital feedback, digital empathy, and global competence. She has been teaching English communicative language skills and training pre-service and in-service teachers for the last 22 years. Currently her research is focused on the effects of bilingualism on dementia and global education cooperation.

She is the first woman Google Certified Innovator and Trainer in Korea. And she is a Microsoft Innovative Educator Expert. She is a leader of Google Educator Group Gyeonggi. She supports shifts in pedagogy and practice through professional development, training of teachers and educators in K12 and higher education on uptake of new technology, and facilitating conversations and planning between the community, school boards, teachers, administrators, and students. She is also leading a Global educator group with 80 leaders from all over the world to connect and support educators worldwide and make the world a smaller, and better place.

James G. Rush, II

Mr. James G. Rush, II, has been working in South Korea at Luther University since fall of 2016. Beginning in 2017, he became actively involved in events for the local Yongin Chapter and Korea TESOL at the national level. Currently, James is the president of the Yongin Chapter and is part of the International Outreach Committee.

James has taught at all levels from K-to-University and has a masters degree in educational technology. He has lived, worked and instructed in numerous countries, grade-levels and cultural settings. While his position is primarily focused on the use of EFL (English as a Foreign Language), he desires to encourage students to develop as life-long-learners and critical thinkers. As a member of the Google Educator Group-Gyeonggi (GEG-GG), James desires to learn the tools to be considered a certified Google Educator.

Tech Clinic with Joe Dale (Tuesday) #1135


Tue, Feb 23, 17:00-18:30 JST | Main Stage

We are delighted to announce that Joe Dale, an edtech specialist based in the UK, will be leading a number of tech clinics during KOTESOL 2021!

Joe’s sessions will be focused around any edtech questions and issues you are having, both in general and specifically during the pandemic. If you are interested in attending one of Joe’s clinics, we invite you to send in your questions and he will suggest some practical solutions that should help to improve your practice. His considerable experience in this area (see his bio below) means that he will be able to provide quality, substantive advice — and if he doesn't know the answer straight away, he'll find it! These sessions will last for 90 minutes, and will be custom-tailored to each group. They will also be small sessions, with attendance capped at 20. For sessions to run there needs to be a minimum of 10 participants. You may sign up for a maximum of 2 sessions.

Session Timetable (subject to minimum sign-up of 10 participants; subject to change)

Monday, February 22 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Tuesday, February 23 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Wednesday, February 24 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Thursday, February 25 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Friday, February 26 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

Registration and question submission will be done via an electronic form that will be accessible shortly.

Tech Clinic with Joe Dale (Wednesday) #1136


Wed, Feb 24, 17:00-18:30 JST | Main Stage

We are delighted to announce that Joe Dale, an edtech specialist based in the UK, will be leading a number of tech clinics during KOTESOL 2021!

Joe’s sessions will be focused around any edtech questions and issues you are having, both in general and specifically during the pandemic. If you are interested in attending one of Joe’s clinics, we invite you to send in your questions and he will suggest some practical solutions that should help to improve your practice. His considerable experience in this area (see his bio below) means that he will be able to provide quality, substantive advice — and if he doesn't know the answer straight away, he'll find it! These sessions will last for 90 minutes, and will be custom-tailored to each group. They will also be small sessions, with attendance capped at 20. For sessions to run there needs to be a minimum of 10 participants. You may sign up for a maximum of 2 sessions.

Session Timetable (subject to minimum sign-up of 10 participants; subject to change)

Monday, February 22 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Tuesday, February 23 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Wednesday, February 24 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Thursday, February 25 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Friday, February 26 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

Registration and question submission will be done via an electronic form that will be accessible shortly.

Tech Clinic with Joe Dale (Thursday) #1137


Thu, Feb 25, 17:00-18:30 JST | Main Stage

We are delighted to announce that Joe Dale, an edtech specialist based in the UK, will be leading a number of tech clinics during KOTESOL 2021!

Joe’s sessions will be focused around any edtech questions and issues you are having, both in general and specifically during the pandemic. If you are interested in attending one of Joe’s clinics, we invite you to send in your questions and he will suggest some practical solutions that should help to improve your practice. His considerable experience in this area (see his bio below) means that he will be able to provide quality, substantive advice — and if he doesn't know the answer straight away, he'll find it! These sessions will last for 90 minutes, and will be custom-tailored to each group. They will also be small sessions, with attendance capped at 20. For sessions to run there needs to be a minimum of 10 participants. You may sign up for a maximum of 2 sessions.

Session Timetable (subject to minimum sign-up of 10 participants; subject to change)

Monday, February 22 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Tuesday, February 23 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Wednesday, February 24 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Thursday, February 25 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Friday, February 26 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

Registration and question submission will be done via an electronic form that will be accessible shortly.

The Future of Teaching English with Technology #1073


Thu, Feb 25, 20:00-21:00 JST | Main Stage

At a webinar last year, an audience member asked a question: “Will language teachers be replaced by technology?” I confidently answered with a big "No". Yet, the question lingers. Surviving almost one year teaching language online, today I am convinced that some language teachers will not be replaced by technology — but others will.

In this talk, I will discuss how technology has been used and how it will continue shaping our job as language teachers. Reflecting on my own teaching experience and exploring the potentials of technology, I will also discuss how future language teachers can teach English with technology.

To be able to successfully teach English with technology, we will need to stop seeing technology as a powerful tool that brings about definite results without considering how it is used.

We need to go beyond finding out whether an app is effective for learning or teaching grammar, vocabulary, or pronunciation, for instance. We need to consider that technology is not merely an instrument we use to serve language teaching purposes. It has penetrated our lives so deeply in many different ways that its use has changed the way we teach and the way language learners learn.

Francisca Maria Ivone currently teaches at the Department of English, Universitas Negeri Malang in Indonesia. She has a Bachelor of Education from IKIP Malang, Indonesia, and a Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in Applied Linguistics from The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. She researches and publishes in the area of ELT, TELL, CALL, Extensive Listening and Viewing (EL/V), Extensive Reading (ER), learning autonomy, and collaborative learning. She is passionate about the use of technology in language teaching and learning. She also gives training to pre-service and in-service teachers on the use of technology in language teaching and learning, ER, and EL/V.

Tech Clinic with Joe Dale (Friday) #1138


Fri, Feb 26, 17:00-18:30 JST | Main Stage

We are delighted to announce that Joe Dale, an edtech specialist based in the UK, will be leading a number of tech clinics during KOTESOL 2021!

Joe’s sessions will be focused around any edtech questions and issues you are having, both in general and specifically during the pandemic. If you are interested in attending one of Joe’s clinics, we invite you to send in your questions and he will suggest some practical solutions that should help to improve your practice. His considerable experience in this area (see his bio below) means that he will be able to provide quality, substantive advice — and if he doesn't know the answer straight away, he'll find it! These sessions will last for 90 minutes, and will be custom-tailored to each group. They will also be small sessions, with attendance capped at 20. For sessions to run there needs to be a minimum of 10 participants. You may sign up for a maximum of 2 sessions.

Session Timetable (subject to minimum sign-up of 10 participants; subject to change)

Monday, February 22 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Tuesday, February 23 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Wednesday, February 24 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Thursday, February 25 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Friday, February 26 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

Registration and question submission will be done via an electronic form that will be accessible shortly.

Why You Should Bring Social Media into Your Classroom #1173

Promotional Visit the Black Cat Publishing page

Sat, Feb 27, 13:00-13:40 JST | Black Cat Room

Speaker: Samuel John Williams

Why You Should Bring Social Media into Your Classroom

Social media plays such an integral role in our student’s lives, and there are a vast array of great resources on these platforms that you can easily use to supplement your English lessons. As an English teacher and social media influencer I take the classic stories from English literature and turn them into contemporary video lessons that your pupils love. Now I’m going to show you how you can use this fantastic educational social media content in your English class.

Does Duolingo Improve Standardized Test Scores? #1042


Sat, Feb 27, 14:00-14:25 JST | Room GHE

Language learning apps are increasingly important study tools. With millions of learners worldwide, Duolingo is one of the most popular such apps. A 2012 study by Vesselinov and Grego stated that beginning learners of Spanish gained the equivalent of a semester's worth of study in 34 hours of Duolingo use. Can Japanese university students make the same gains in English? This study tested 75 first-year students with the TOEIC Bridge test, a common standardized test, before and after 14 weeks of Duolingo use. A linear regression found that the app provided only a tiny average increase to TOEIC scores, indicating that it is not highly effective. Possible reasons for this result, discrepancies between this and other studies, and suggestions for further research will be discussed.

VR & ELL: Current Strategies & Future Directions Following COVID-19 #1122


Sat, Feb 27, 14:30-14:55 JST

Virtual reality (VR) holds the potential to deliver incidental learning experiences in which foreign language acquisition occurs via as opposed to for task performance. Consequently, this presentation aims to illustrate the use of VR as a vehicle for incidental, task-based instruction. Specifically, the capabilities of the Oculus Quest VR headset will be outlined by disclosing the background, implementation, and results of a small-scale study in which tertiary-level Japanese EFL participants utilized VR to navigate the information-gap game Keep Talking & Nobody Explodes. Key findings indicate that the convergence of VR and the game software occasioned learner collaboration and student-led resolution. More distinct to the VR method, however, was an enhanced sense of presence that allowed learners to experience temporary existence within its accompanying “world.” Following this will be a brief outlining of the future directions and capabilities of VR in the wake of COVID-19.

Michael Smith / David McCurrach /

Redefining English Language Teaching for Online Learning #1047


Sat, Feb 27, 15:30-15:55 JST

The global pandemic has paved the way for virtual classrooms and redefined English language teaching. This has brought out the experience of learning outside the context of examination. The language teacher for the first time has become a facilitator and moderator in a situation where self-initiated and collective exploration leads towards sharing, questioning, and providing feedback. The objective of this presentation on redefining English language teaching for online learning is to explore significant changes in education due to the challenging circumstances created by COVID-19 with special reference to English language teaching in the Sri Lankan context primarily based on personal experience. This presentation briefly describes the context of English language teaching in Sri Lankan universities and emphasizes the role of educational technology during the pandemic to enhance the second language skills of the learners. Strategies for designing lesson plans and pedagogical input to improve the creativity of students using various resources are also explored in this presentation.

Facilitating Interactive Learning Online with Nearpod #1080


Sat, Feb 27, 15:30-16:10 JST | Room GL

As the coronavirus has caused many universities around the world to hold classes virtually, facilitating interactive learning online has become a new challenge among teachers. In my workshop, I will showcase the online lesson tool known as Nearpod, which I have used for two semesters for Japanese intermediate and upper-intermediate university English learners. Research has shown that Nearpod promotes active learning through its use of immediate feedback and its ability to facilitate collaborative participation between students, teachers, and lesson content (Amasha et al., 2018, Hakami, 2020). My workshop will allow teachers opportunities to see how Nearpod can be used for effective discussions, reading activities, vocabulary activities, student-paced assignments, and informing future instruction through its post-class reports feature. Finally, I will share the results of a quantitative survey of student self-reported perceptions of Nearpod, which indicated that students felt the lesson platform positively supplemented their online learning experience.

Once Upon a Time: Digital Storytelling to Enrich Asynchronous Classrooms #1055


Sat, Feb 27, 16:00-16:25 JST

This presentation reports on an action research project that used collaborative digital storytelling activities to help increase student communication, engagement, interaction, and motivation in an asynchronous classroom. An intact class of university students participated in a 3-week study where they used Flipgrid (a video-sharing platform) to co-construct narrative stories. Participant motivation and engagement were measured through a qualitative survey. Storytelling has been considered a useful exercise for language learners because it offers an opportunity for meaning-focused use of the target language through narrative structures. While there is a gap in research on collaborative storytelling, an added benefit of it is that learners must negotiate for meaning as they co-construct a single story. With the current need for online classes, platforms such as Flipgrid enable learners to easily create, share, and respond to each other’s videos. While preliminary, results suggest that online collaborative digital storytelling will enrich the asynchronous classroom.

Potential and Challenges of the Use of VR in English Education #1025


Sun, Feb 28, 09:30-09:55 JST

It is said that the use of VR can lead to increasing intrinsic motivation, raising cross-cultural awareness, and reducing affective filters during language learning (Schwienhorst, 2002). A study by Grant et al. (2013) reported a lower level of foreign language anxiety (FLA) among students using a virtual environment than students studying in a real-life classroom. Eight Japanese university students experienced VR English lessons developed by Immerse Inc. Before and after taking these VR lessons, the students took a TOEIC speaking test and completed a questionnaire survey about FLA. While taking the lessons, the students wrote in a journal about their VR experience in each lesson. In this presentation, I will discuss the possibility and challenges of using VR for English education by referring to the characteristics and contents of the VR lessons and the results of the TOEIC speaking tests, questionnaire surveys about FLA, and content-analysis of the journals.

Re-thinking Presentation Design Together #1141


Sun, Feb 28, 14:30-15:15 JST | KOTESOL Room

Presentation software is one of the most commonly used tools of instruction in educational technology. At the university level, it is regularly used to display lecture notes and assignments, but as we move down each stage of formal learning, its use tends to gradually decrease. At some schools, the use of technology in the classroom is discouraged or prohibited, and at others, the required equipment may not be readily available or accessible.

When classes were pushed online due to the COVID pandemic, a number of EFL teachers found themselves turning to presentation software —some for the first time in the classroom. Those who were familiar with its use in this setting were at an advantage, but a general desire to use the software creatively to engage students increased, as was evidenced by the teachers who reached out to me for help in designing their lessons. While some EFL teachers may be aware of creative ways in which they can use presentation software, finding design inspiration and moving from concept to creation can be a challenge, especially when their familiarity with the software is not that high.

In this presentation, I will help you re-think presentation design. I will re-introduce you to some of the features available in desktop presentation software, and I will guide you through practical exercises geared at helping you to think creatively about how you can display information on your slides and engage your students. Come prepared to channel your inner creativity!

This presentation is brought to you by the MCALL Special Interest Group

Multimedia and Computer-Assisted Language Learning SIG Sessions #1062


Sun, Feb 28, 14:30-18:00 JST | KOTESOL Room

1. Activating Speaking Skills in Online and Asynchronous Environments, Isobel Hook ("101" workshop, 40 minutes),

Over the past year, many language classes have moved online due to health concerns. Educators and institutions alike have responded to this in a variety of ways, from embracing and encouraging the changes to resistance and insisting that language skills could never be taught online. However, having increased student control over the way a speaking task is conducted allows many students to excel when they would have otherwise floundered.

This presentation will discuss how various class systems and digital tools can be used to encourage active learning and focus on different speaking-associated challenges such as timing, content, and performance anxiety, which can hinder students' active learning. In traditional classrooms, students who struggled with one or more of these elements may have found they struggled with speaking tasks. A wide variety of approaches helps teachers to individually target these elements of speaking while encouraging self-evaluation, accountability, and independence.

2. A New Normal? Reflecting on the Opportunities and Costs of a Year of Mass Remote Learning (

The past 12 months in higher education have brought mass accredited remote learning from an idea to a reality. This workshop will discuss the response to continuing education in the pandemic as one of necessary firefighting or one of a glimpse of a new future. Major questions have been raised about the purpose of higher education, and the role of pedagogy within tertiary learning itself. Some of these questions have been long-term considerations about the changing role of the university in society, while others are fought on the battleground of how educational technology should be utilized within the learning context.

During this workshop, participants will be asked to share their experiences of remote learning, consider what their expectations of tertiary education are, and the lessons that can be learned going forward from 2020.

3. Re-thinking Presentation Design Together, Lisa M. Hunsberger

Presentation software is regularly used at the university level to display lecture notes and assignments, but as we move down each stage of formal learning, its use tends to gradually decrease. When classes were pushed online due to the COVID pandemic, a number of EFL teachers found themselves turning to presentation software —some for the first time in the classroom. While some teachers were aware of the creative ways in which they could use presentation software, finding design inspiration and moving from concept to creation was a challenge.

In this presentation, I will help you re-think presentation design. I will re-introduce some of the features available in desktop presentation software, and I will guide you through practical exercises geared at helping you to think creatively about how you can display information on a slide and engage your students. Come prepared to channel your inner creativity!

4. A New Normal? Reflecting on the Opportunities and Costs of a Year of Mass Remote Learning, Michael Brandon (Workshop, 80 minutes)

5. Innovative Assessment Practices, Victor Reeser (Workshop, 40 minutes)

While there are more online and digital teaching resources available to educators today than ever before, fossilized teaching practices and institutional restrictions often lead to oversimplification of assessment practices to the detriment of our students. This workshop will discuss traditional assessment practices, including their purpose and metrics, and explore research-backed methods of evolving assessment to meet the needs of today’s English-language learners (ELLs). By establishing standards-based assessments and utilizing tools such as skill inventories, reporting forms, and comments, educators can accurately measure student progress and adapt their lessons to meet individual needs. The efficacy of practices such as accepting late work and allowing students to resubmit work will also be discussed. Attendees can expect an engaging and thoughtful discussion on the topic and should be prepared to participate.

The past 12 months in higher education have brought mass accredited remote learning from an idea to a reality. This workshop will discuss the response to continuing education in the pandemic as one of necessary firefighting or one of a glimpse of a new future. Major questions have been raised about the purpose of higher education, and the role of pedagogy within tertiary learning itself. Some of these questions have been long-term considerations about the changing role of the university in society, while others are fought on the battleground of how educational technology should be utilized within the learning context.

During this workshop, participants will be asked to share their experiences of remote learning, consider what their expectations of tertiary education are, and the lessons that can be learned going forward from 2020.

Activating Speaking Skills in Online and Asynchronous Environments #1142


Sun, Feb 28, 15:15-16:00 JST | KOTESOL Room

Over the past year, many educators have seen classes move online due to health concerns. Educators and institutions alike have responded to this in a variety of ways, from embracing and encouraging the changes to resistance and insisting that language skills could never be taught online. However, this move to distance learning is neither new nor revolutionary. Distance education has been used for decades and is an increasingly popular alternative for learners who are unable to attend traditional institutes for a variety of reasons. In fact, having increased control over a speaking task's pace, environment, time, topic, direction and amount of preparation allows many students to excel when they would have otherwise floundered.

This presentation will discuss how various class systems and digital tools can be used to encourage active learning and focus on different speaking-associated challenges. In this context, active learning is defined as students who are engaged with the materials via both their knowledge of the language and through social connections. The ability to speak in another language is affected by several elements such as pronunciation, timed output, content and clarity, receiving and responding, and performance anxiety, all of which can hinder students' active learning. In traditional classrooms, students who struggled with one or more of these elements may have found they were unable to complete speaking tasks to the best of their ability or participate at all. Using a wide variety of tools and approaches, teachers are able to individually target these elements of speaking and encourage student self-evaluation, accountability, and independence.

Instead of fearing that increased distance learning will result in the devaluation of English teachers, we should instead use our skills and knowledge to improve the quality of teaching and keep moving forward with the times. Creating spaces and materials for active learning allows students to define their needs and challenges and allows for students with a wider range of skills to succeed in speaking tasks.

This presentation is brought to you by the MCALL Special Interest Group

A New Normal? Reflecting on the Opportunities and Costs of a Year of Mass Remote Learning #1143


Sun, Feb 28, 16:00-17:20 JST | KOTESOL Room

In response to the pandemic crisis, the Korean Ministry of Education had to create a universal response to ensure the standardized quality of the Korean higher education system, and to allow enrolled students to continue their studies. Using a set of measures for recorded and live classes these rigid rules provided some assurance that a set of standards could be maintained, a key factor considering the peninsula’s growing dependence on overseas students. Almost one year on, as a new academic year prepares to roll out on-line, do these measures provide a glimpse of an online future of higher education, or do they remain a set of necessary measures ready for lifting once the pandemic eases? There has been long-term discussion on what university actually means in the modern world, as higher education and institutions have shifted from small scale centres of scholarship to large scale global centres of learning. How learning should take place within higher education is a pressing issue brought even more to the fore by concerns on integrating educational technology and new pedagogies in a more digitized era. Has the experience of remote learning highlighted the importance of well-rounded and contextualized pedagogy, or has it exposed limits and weaknesses in tertiary learning? This workshop considers the pedagogical implications of the past 12 months, the economic factors involved, and the teleological issues at the heart of online learning. It will offer discussion sessions for sharing the experiences of the past 12 months and build up a reflective framework for participants to consider the purpose and goals of what is taking place within the remote learning space and what lessons can be learned and applied going forward.

This presentation is brought to you by the MCALL Special Interest Group.

Teaching Presentation Skills Online: A Case Study #1014


Sun, Feb 28, 16:30-16:55 JST | Room SP

This study aimed to help improve students’ public speaking skills, which is a graduation requirement at International University. A total of 44 intermediate-level students were selected, and a mixed model with a pre-test, a post-test, and observation was applied. In addition to the lecturer’s input and tips, the experimental students benefited from cooperative learning and technology applications. Also, they were required to video-record their homework presentations and give feedback and suggestions on other presentations based on a checklist provided. Google Drive was recommended to give students easy access to sample presentations for reflections and self-improvement. After the eight-week treatment, results from the pre-test and post-test revealed that students in the experimental group achieved better scores on their presentations in terms of organization and visual aids and minor improvement in pronunciation, lexical usage, and grammatical usage. This sheds light on an alternative for teaching public speaking online.

Creating your own event with Eventzil.la #1185


Sun, Feb 28, 17:00-17:40 JST

The team behind Eventzil.la, Gary Ross and Stephen Henneberry, will be giving an informal look at how you can use the system to host your own event, and some pointers and tips to make your event successful. We will be reflecting on the Kotesol2021, and talking about the improvements coming. Eventzil.la has successfully hosted over 1000 presentations and 10,000 participants from small seminars to large international events with hundreds of sessions. Invisible to attendees is the powerful and easy to use admin area that makes this possible, and this session will give also give a brief look at that in action.

Innovative Assessment Practices #1144


Sun, Feb 28, 17:30-18:20 JST | KOTESOL Room

While there are more online and digital teaching resources available to educators today than ever before, fossilized teaching practices and institutional restrictions often lead to oversimplification of assessment practices to the detriment of our students. This workshop will discuss traditional assessment practices, including their purpose and metrics, and explore research-backed methods of evolving assessment to meet the needs of today’s English-language learners (ELLs). By establishing standards-based assessments and utilizing tools such as skill inventories, reporting forms, and comments, educators can accurately measure student progress and adapt their lessons to meet individual needs. The efficacy of practices such as accepting late work and allowing students to resubmit work will also be discussed. Attendees can expect an engaging and thoughtful discussion on the topic and should be prepared to participate.