Sessions / Synchronous-Zoom

Opening Ceremony #1169


Fri, Feb 19, 19:00-20:00 JST | Main Stage

We begin KOTESOL 2021 with some of the traditional pomp and circumstance, but also with a few twists.

Your hosts will be Bryan Hale (President) and Rhea Metituk (1st Vice-President). They will welcome everyone, including our special guests. Maybe they'll do something else, as well. International Conference Chair Michael Free will muse and amuse (he hopes) with a preamble to the main event, entitled "Love and Messes" We'll also be asking how you are feeling.

The Zoom room will open at 6:00, and we'll also be welcoming people on our Discord server as well!

The Next 10 Years in Technology and Society — and What It All Means for ELT #1057


Fri, Feb 19, 20:00-21:00 JST | Main Stage

Futurist, humanist, and author Gerd Leonhard takes us through the possibilities and probabilities of the next decade. Based on decades of experience as a virtual keynote speaker and consultant with an impressive client list, he brings his considerable expertise to bear in this dynamic presentation. He asks, with reference to both technology and society, what are the things we can look forward to in the next 10 years? What opportunities lie ahead in our next decade? What are the challenges we face as human beings? And last but not least, what are the questions we in the profession of ELT should be asking during the course of this conference — and beyond — if we are to create together a positive, enduring future?

* This keynote will be prerecorded and will be made available to conference attendees by the following morning. We would ask that you do *not* share it publicly, but you are more than welcome to record it for your own personal purposes. ** The keynote will be followed by our opening night panel plus a moderated "Q and A" session. *** If you have a question for Gerd Leonhard, please feel free to submit it on our Discord server, or you can wait for his appearance at our Conference Retrospective on Sunday, February 28, at 7:30 p.m.

*** View the video of Gerd Leonhard's keynote presentation here: https://kotesol2021.eventzil.la/session/1174 ***

Gerd Leonhard / 2021 Conference Chair /

Opening Night Panel + Q and A Session #1170


Fri, Feb 19, 21:00-22:20 JST | Main Stage

After Gerd Leonhard has told us a bit about our futures as humans in this rapidly changing world, we need to begin to think about this in terms of ELT. Our opening night panel lets attendees hear the voices of 5 different professionals, from an early-career teacher to one of the most experienced educators in Korea. Each will briefly describe their thoughts and feelings about what may / might / will happen in ELT, in order to prime attendees to reflect on their own future(s) in the days ahead.

Our panelists are:

John Endicott: President, Woosung University

Judy Yin: Associate Professor, Korea National University of Education

Lisa M. Hunsberger: Lecturer, Kyushu Sangyo University; Presentation Design Specialist

Sydney Fortowsky: Korean Government Scholar, Korea University; Early-Career English Language Teacher

Stafford Lumsden: Researcher, Macquarie University; Online Teaching and Learning Specialist

Come listen, and be inspired!

Teaching a Foreign Language with Computational Thinking #1043


Sat, Feb 20, 09:30-10:10 JST | Room EK

This presentation aims to demonstrate how to use Scratch as a tool to teach students a foreign language while enabling them to develop computational thinking. As this workshop is designed for practitioners who do not have any prior knowledge about coding and computer science, workshop participants are expected to practice Scratch activities created by the presenter to get familiar with the block-based programming tool and functions during this workshop. Participants will come away with ideas to create their own Scratch lessons while practicing with the given examples. Since Scratch was developed for children, K-12 instructors are welcome to join this session.

English Language Program Accreditation: Standards to Support Success #1090


Sat, Feb 20, 09:30-10:10 JST | Auxiliary Stage

The Commission on English Language Program Accreditation (CEA) is a U.S.-based non-governmental, non-profit accrediting agency that is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as an authority on the accreditation of postsecondary English language programs in universities and colleges and independent English language schools. CEA provides accreditation services in the U.S. and internationally. Among accrediting agencies, CEA is considered a specialized agency in that it accredits a specific field of study. CEA is also considered a hybrid agency in that it grants both programmatic and institutional accreditation. CEA’s mission statement reflects CEA’s scope of accreditation as well as common attributes of accrediting agencies in the U.S. This presentation will briefly explain the development of CEA, its mission, and its values; provide information about the accreditation process; and highlight some requirements of the CEA Standards for English Language Programs and Institutions that support professionalism in English language teaching at the postsecondary level.

Vocabulary Instruction to Meet the Needs of All English Learners #1099


Sat, Feb 20, 09:30-10:10 JST | Room GJ

This presentation discusses principles of effective, relevant, and appropriate vocabulary instruction that can be used in face-to-face or online instruction. In determining which vocabulary to select for instruction, it is important to select items that will most benefit learners, including high-frequency, academic, and specialized content-area words. Instructional methods that intentionally incorporate repeated exposure to new information in verbal, visual, and spatial forms develop learners’ ability to memorize, store, process, and use vocabulary information needed to complete complex instructional activities in English. When students have opportunities to learn and practice different vocabulary routines, they are then able to take ownership of those that work best for them in their own student-led learning. A variety of such vocabulary activities that can be applied to diverse English language teaching contexts are shared in this presentation. Participants should expect to engage digitally during the presentation, using platforms including PollEv, BINGO Baker, and Kahoot!

Pecha Kucha Extravaganza #1092


Sat, Feb 20, 09:30-11:00 JST | Main Stage

Synchronous Pecha Kucha: * Marc Jones, "Making Your Classes ADHD-Aware: Simple Tips for Inclusion" * James Papple, "TESOL Affiliate Network and Professional Council Overview" * Kinsella Valies, "You Talking to Me? English-Speaking Practice Through Movies" * Jason Wolfe & Jonathan Adreano, "UnGoogleability and Radical Creativity"

Asynchronous Pecha Kucha: * Daniela Trinks, "Teaching the Board Game Go to English Learners" * Takano Yoko, "Online Project-Based Teaching’s Benefits to Young Learners and Their Families"

*** Note: Each pecha kucha is just under 7 minutes long (20 slides at 20 seconds per slide). ***

Making Your Classes ADHD-Aware: Simple Tips for Inclusion #1125


Sat, Feb 20, 09:30-11:00 JST | Main Stage

The number of people with ADHD is estimated to be approximately 7% of the population, and many may actually be high achievers. As someone living with ADHD, teaching and learning languages, I have a useful perspective. In this pecha kucha, I will give an overview of problems that learners with ADHD face in their language learning (such as working memory, executive function) and how to make classrooms (virtual and physical) more inclusive for learners with ADHD (not simply breaks). The added bonus is it makes it better for everyone else. After the pecha kucha, I would like the opportunity for a Q&A.

** Part of the Pecha Kucha Extravaganza; each pecha kucha is just under 7 minutes long (20 slides at 20 seconds per slide).

You Talking to Me? English-Speaking Practice Through Movies #1126


Sat, Feb 20, 09:30-11:00 JST | Main Stage

Independent and incidental acquisition of vocabulary through film is a life-long learning skill. This research project examines a two-day, face-to-face, film-based speaking course. It investigates how the use of intentional vocabulary-learning activities and production through contextual cues were effective in converting passive mastery into active production. The qualitative approach consists of recorded conversations, instructor observations, and pre- and post-course surveys. The participants were mixed-level businesspeople and public servants who used English at work. Observations and recordings highlighted a greater understanding and active application of the vocabulary introduced. Surveys showed that student confidence in their ability to express themselves in general conversation decreased by 16.4% from "I can do it (easily)" to "I need more practice," while confidence in work-related English use decreased by 17.3%. It can be concluded that pre-course level-assessment, confidence-building, and maximizing output time can improve active use of language acquired through film.

** Part of the Pecha Kucha Extravaganza; each pecha kucha is just under 7 minutes long (20 slides at 20 seconds per slide).

UnGoogleability and Radical Creativity #1128


Sat, Feb 20, 09:30-11:00 JST

"The world is online: entertainment, communication, and--more recently--a lot of education, and even this conference. Unfortunately, the answers to many questions are online, as well. What is not a Google search away? Teachers, now more than ever, need to be unique and creative in their tasks and assessments so that students are forced to be unique and creative in their submissions. This short presentation will explore the concepts of unGoogleability and radical creativity, give some examples, and show how teachers can add it to their assessments. If teachers can default to creativity, students will learn that some things are not a Google search away and develop the creative problem-solving skills they will inevitably need to navigate the unknown future."

** Part of the Pecha Kucha Extravaganza; each pecha kucha is just under 7 minutes long (20 slides at 20 seconds per slide).

TESOL Affiliate Network and Professional Council Overview #1130


Sat, Feb 20, 09:30-11:00 JST | Main Stage

This pecha kucha will explore the work of TESOL's Affiliate Network and Professional Council (ANPC) and its role with global affiliates. Present and future affiliate leaders will learn about the support the ANPC can offer.

** Part of the Pecha Kucha Extravaganza; each pecha kucha is just under 7 minutes long (20 slides at 20 seconds per slide).

Factors That Affect Reconstructing Lexical Meaning in Listening Comprehension #1001


Sat, Feb 20, 10:30-10:55 JST | Room DRJ

This research examines factors that affect reconstructing lexical meaning in listening comprehension. There is not much research examining affective factors in reconstructing vocabulary meaning in listening comprehension for EFL learners. Therefore, this study aims to find out some factors that affect language learners' word decoding to understand the overall meaning of a listening passage. A mixed-methods approach was used to investigate the elements in both quantitative and qualitative ways. To find out affective factors and apply the findings for better teaching listening directions, this study deals with 3 research questions: 1) What effect did a variety of listening passage variables have on the number of words that participants were able to identify? 2) Did the number and type of words identified have an effect on general understanding? 3) What were the participants' perceptions of the variables in each listening activity?

Addressing the Reading-Writing Gap in Second Language Learning #1077


Sat, Feb 20, 11:00-12:00 JST | Main Stage

Research shows that reading and writing are closely connected. Students who can read well can be expected to write well. However, repeated observations show that this is not always the case. Students who have developed an advanced reading ability often continue to experience difficulty when they try to express themselves in writing.

In my talk, I first discuss oft-cited sources of students’ writing difficulties, which typically involve difficulties at the linguistic (e.g., grammar and vocabulary) and cognitive levels (e.g., text coherence). I will then explore the relationship between reading and writing in detail, highlighting areas that need to be linked more closely together.

In the last section, I will present an instructional model that can promote more efficient processing of language by the students. The model encourages student writers to engage in writerly reading and readerly writing to further strengthen their writing proficiency. This talk will be of interest to teachers who wish to better understand the link between reading and writing and how they can help students become better writers.

Dr. Willy A Renandya is a language teacher educator with extensive teaching experience in Asia. He currently teaches applied linguistics courses at the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He is a frequent speaker at international ELT conferences and has published extensively in the area of second language education. His publications include Language Teaching Methodology: An anthology of current practice (CUP 2002, with Jack C Richards) and Student-centred cooperative learning (Springer 2019, With George Jacobs).

Why Do(n’t) Foreign English Teachers Learn Korean? A Narrative Study #1052


Sat, Feb 20, 13:00-13:25 JST | Room RR

Ask around, and you will find many foreign English teachers in Korea who think their Korean “should be better.” But what does this mean? Better for what? What motivates foreign teachers to learn Korean? And why do some teachers end up going much further with Korean than others? This presentation will provide some answers to these questions. The presenter, a (formerly) committed learner of Korean, will outline the results of a narrative study on the Korean learning experiences of foreign teachers. He will show how these teachers narrated their Korean learning motivations, and he will relate their narratives to several current motivational theories. At issue in this presentation is the influence of identity, social/romantic connections, beliefs about language learning/teaching, and formal and informal Korean learning experiences on motivation. This presentation will be of interest to those who wonder why some language learners ultimately achieve greater competence than others.

Designing an Intensive Reading Lesson #1056


Sat, Feb 20, 13:00-13:40 JST | Auxiliary Stage

If extensive reading is easy or pleasure reading, intensive reading may be the opposite: the teacher selects slightly more challenging texts, and readers practice target skills and strategies when approaching the text. In many classrooms, the qualities of intensive reading may be more common than those of extensive reading, but how sure can we be that students are reading intensively? In this workshop, we’ll approach the defining goals and traits of intensive reading, including the common reading stages (before, during and after reading), lesson design considerations, and digital tools that could help teachers and students alike. As not all reading class contexts are the same, we may also discuss how elements of the intensive reading process can be adapted to the audience’s teaching context.

Re-envisioning Leveled Reading Instruction #1098


Sat, Feb 20, 13:00-13:40 JST | Room GL

As instructors, we all work with English learners with diverse language proficiencies, prior experiences, and resources. Reading instruction no longer involves all students reading the same text at the same time at the same level, progressing at the same rate. Therefore, existing reading mandates, curricula, and materials may be inadequate to meet the needs of the actual learners in a class. This presentation shares varied free digital resources for accessing levelled texts that can be used online or printed out, as well as reading level assessments and interactive comprehension activities. These tools used together can give teachers the capability to identify learners’ present English reading levels, provide learners with language input at their instructional level, guide learners in choosing independent reading materials at their instructional level, and track learner reading growth over time. Participants can expect to engage digitally throughout the presentation, using platforms including PollEv, Padlet, and Kahoot!

Green ELT: Imperatives and Conversations #1038


Sat, Feb 20, 13:00-15:00 JST | Main Stage

The future of all things depends on actions taken today, and nowhere is this more evident than in the ecological sphere. Despite almost five decades of environmental education programs, very little change is evident in how humans and nature interact. This panel discussion will present views from philosophy, education and social perspectives, with specific emphasis on how to integrate the vocabulary for discussion of ecological issues. Unless those who talk about problems and solutions understand each other, there is little progress.

Creating a Hybrid Class, from the Pre-Pandemic to the Pandemic Era #1004


Sat, Feb 20, 14:00-14:40 JST | Room RR

The presenters will share tips and tricks to create a well-organized flipped classroom that invites student participation and produces marked improvement in speaking skills. All meta-skills are utilized in this active, student-centered hybrid teaching style. Learning objectives are focused on developing confidence and fluency as well as providing attention to pronunciation and intonation and incorporate methods for providing corrective feedback derived from a pedagogy emphasizing student-centered learning, metacognition, and student self-reflection. The presenters have been working together over the course of several semesters, both pre-pandemic to teach freshman speaking skills in hybrid classrooms offline using Google classroom, and during the pandemic in real-time, online classes using a university LMS. Workshop attendees can glean takeaways shared on challenges faced and solutions discovered in the process of flipping a class and moving a class online, as well as have opportunities to discuss their own classes with other teachers who have similar goals.

Say It Because You Mean It: Empowering Student Voice #1021


Sat, Feb 20, 14:00-15:00 JST | Room GJ

Many students have a strong desire to develop confidence in the use of their second language, but how can we support them in that seemingly intangible goal? According to many coaches, confidence is built upon a progression of practice, skill, and success. However, even – or especially – within the language classroom, there are aspects to student success that lie beyond grammar, paragraph structure, or presentation skills. We will begin this session with a brief description of the concept of "student voice" and then explore how teachers can use this concept to guide students in developing, maintaining, and building upon a pattern of success. Participants will be encouraged to share their own ideas, examples, or experiences of integrating student voice into the structure and discipline of academic writing and speaking, and will be challenged to find new ways to do so in the coming year.

Teaching L2 Students Critical Review Writing Skills Through Appraisal #1139


Sat, Feb 20, 15:30-15:55 JST CANCELLED

This study attempts to reveal the implementation and use of attitude appraisal to enhance students’ critical-review writing skills. The students were asked to write a critical review of a journal they had read; however, before they started to write the text, they were introduced to and trained on how to use appraisal items including affect, judgment, and appreciation. The data of this study were thirty-nine students’ critical-review writings, which were analyzed using the appraisal framework suggested by Martin and White (2005). The results of this study reveal that most students were able to give a critical review of the journal they had read. Judgment was the type of appraisal most used by students. It deals with behavior that students admire or criticize, praise or condemn. In addition, it was seen that students’ perceptions of the journal varied based on the use of affect, judgment, and appreciation.

Japanese University Students' Perceptions of English Native-Speakerism #1005


Sat, Feb 20, 15:30-15:55 JST | Room GK

The native/non-native English-speaking teacher (NEST/NNEST) dichotomy in the English language learning/teaching context has been the topic of research interest for a long time. An increasing number of research works (e.g., Mahboob, 2004; Samimy & Brutt-Griffler, 1999) have addressed a need for rethinking native-speakerism. Nevertheless, little has been done from a bottom-up standpoint that deeply investigates the attitudes of students, as one of the main stakeholders. This exploratory study aims to address this gap in the research. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from Japanese undergraduate university students (N=278) at two private universities in November 2020. The findings show that many participants perceived a significant difference between NESTs and NNESTs, especially in terms of pronunciation and accent, and discuss the reasons for Japanese students’ negative attitudes towards their own English, as well as the influence of American hegemony and standardized tests (particularly TOEIC) on the students’ learning journeys.

Graduate Student Showcase Presentations #1060


Sat, Feb 20, 15:30-18:00 JST | Main Stage

This session will feature presentations by our cohort of graduate students:

Matt French, "Mental Lexicons and Word Association: A Small-Scale Study" (sync) Nur Fitri Gebers, "Example of a Communicative Lesson for a Mixed-Ability Online English Literature Class" (sync) Gizem Genç & Antonina Nemtinova, "Identities of Turkish High School Students and Their Effects on Learners’ Perceptions of Lesson Theme" (sync) Ehean Kim, "Scratch Coding Workshop Through Design-Based Research" (sync) Kirsten Razzaq, "From SOS to Success: The Distance Learners’ Dissertation Toolkit" (sync) Charlotte Otto, "The Role That English Plays in the World Today" (async) Helmut Otto, "Language Planning: An Example from Africa" (async) Robin Maurice, "A Framework for Adapting and Exploiting Authentic Materials with Young English Learners" (async)

Online Classes: Surviving and Thriving in 2021 #1061


Sat, Feb 20, 15:30-18:00 JST | KOTESOL Room

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, online teaching has moved from a position of tenuous acceptance and application into standard practice across the world. From parents to students to educators, everyone has undoubtedly struggled with this shift. In this panel, members of the Multimedia and CALL Special Interest Group (MCALL-SIG) as well as two invited speakers will review positive and negative experiences with online teaching; discuss the challenges of converting standardized offline classes to online classes; explore strategies to adapt offline teaching practices to online classes; and share insights into what it takes to succeed in education today.

The panel will also be prepared to engage with audience members on specific questions related to online education, using technology in their classes, and solutions and resources to assist educators with tech-related issues in their respective classrooms. Attendees will leave with a renewed perspective on online teaching as well as practical solutions to the challenges of teaching offline courses in an online setting.

Identities of Turkish High School Students and Their Effects on Learners’ Perceptions of Lesson Themes #1162


Sat, Feb 20, 15:30-18:00 JST | Main Stage

The aim of the present study is to understand how Turkish learners’ identities affect their perceptions of the target-language community culture and home-country culture themes, namely a Christmas-themed lesson, being a taboo in Turkish education, and a New Year-themed lesson, belonging to the home-country culture as well as being international. Three different methods of data collection used in order to triangulate the data: a demographic information form, questionnaires, interviews, and field notes from the teacher conducting the study. There is a dearth of research in terms of Turkish students’ identities and their effects on learners’ perceptions of topics, materials, and discourse used in the EFL classroom; therefore, this study aims to fill a gap in the literature. The results of this small-scale study suggest that students showed preference in favor of the local culture-based lesson, as they had the opportunity to share their real cultural experiences.

*** Part of the Graduate Student Showcase; this presentation, itself, is ~25 minutes long. ***

Scratch Coding Workshop Through Design-Based Research #1163


Sat, Feb 20, 15:30-18:00 JST | Main Stage

This presentation aims to introduce the features of design-based research and an example design-based research project that was designed by the presenter. The example research project is about digital storytelling activities through Scratch to teach students both computational skills and a foreign language. The rationale for the Scratch coding workshop research project and research designs will be presented with literature reviews. Participants will come away with ideas of how to create design-based research while exploring the example project in the presentation.

*** Part of the Graduate Student Showcase; this presentation, itself, is ~25 minutes long. ***

From SOS to Success: The Distance Learners’ Dissertation Toolkit #1165


Sat, Feb 20, 15:30-18:00 JST | Main Stage

Distance learning has the advantage of location independence when pursuing higher education qualifications while working abroad in EFL contexts. One of the disadvantages when entering the dissertation stage is that institutional support can fall short of what on-campus learners have access to, due to the distances involved and logistics of synchronous communication. The limited contact with tutors and supervisors can feel impersonal, and connections with peers can be minimal or non-existent. The resulting lack of an in-person support network may feel isolating, with no one to bounce ideas off or talk through problems and questions when they arise. This presentation will discuss the challenges experienced while completing the dissertation for an MA TESOL as a distance learner and share the online and offline resources that made all the difference.

*** Part of the Graduate Student Showcase; this presentation, itself, is ~25 minutes long. ***

Mental Lexicons and Word Association: A Small-Scale Study #1166


Sat, Feb 20, 15:30-18:00 JST | Main Stage

The question of how words are organized in language learners’ minds has become increasingly relevant as acknowledgement of the importance of vocabulary has increased. The concept of the mental lexicon attempts to model the connections between those words and to provide a map for how learners organize those associations. This presentation will look at common word relationships that comprise the mental lexicon using a small-scale word association task (WAT) as a method of graphing these connections in Japanese non-native speakers (NNSs) of English and native speakers. Also of interest to other graduate students, I will be discussing the process of preparing, conducting, coding and analyzing the WAT results and some pitfalls I hope to help you avoid, should you wish to run your own small-scale WAT.

*** Part of the Graduate Student Showcase; this presentation, itself, is ~25 minutes long. ***

Unveiling Racism in TESOL: The Caribbean Perspective #1027


Sat, Feb 20, 16:00-16:25 JST | Room LMH

The recent and continuing demonstrations dotted throughout the world provoked by the murder of George Floyd unveil the dirty truths of systemic racism and its deleterious impacts on Black communities and other communities of colour. Over the last two decades, there have been growing enquiries into race and racism in the TESOL fraternity that have illuminated that English language education is not neutral and absolved from the manacles of racism but, in fact, complicit in being gatekeepers of oppression, supporting white supremacy and sustaining coloniality. This theoretical presentation contributes to the burgeoning discourses on racism in language education by focusing on the first tenet of Critical Race Theory, the ubiquity of racism, as articulated by critical legal scholar Derrick Bell. By explicating the corporeal experiences and professional mobility of Anglophone Caribbean teachers, this talk magnifies the centrality of racism calcified in the Asian TESOL contexts.

A Platform for Application of Picture Books for Novice Teachers #1121


Sat, Feb 20, 16:00-16:25 JST | Room GHE

The Japanese government launched their new English language education system for Japanese public elementary schools in the 2020 academic year. In the near future, it is anticipated that English classes will be conducted more by homeroom teachers, who are possibly less experienced in teaching English, due to the limited budget and insufficient number of English language professionals in Japanese public elementary schools. One policy the Japanese government has recently promoted is the application of picture books. The aim of this presentation is to provide a platform that enables those novice teachers to utilize categorization charts that the presenter developed for picture books. The platform expedites the process for selecting appropriate picture books as well as their supplementary materials and creating relevant language-learning activities for English lessons. The presenter also seeks to extend this project involving university students as well as local educators of young learners throughout Japan.

Spoken Fluency Practice for Improving TOEFL Writing: A Case Study #1044


Sat, Feb 20, 16:30-17:50 JST | Room GK

In keeping with the conference theme of re-envisioning, rethinking, and re-evaluating our teaching as reflective practitioners, this presentation will give a case study that supports what we have intuitively felt all along as teachers--namely, that conversation practice does have its place in and effect on academic performance and test results. Despite advances in areas of applied science such as brain theory and AI for language teaching and learning, we must return to the realization that our students are human beings who need social and emotional support and affirmation. This presentation will illustrate how a student can thrive personally and academically when English language learning includes not only academic tutoring but also support for building self-confidence and self-esteem, factors which undeniably contribute to successful performance in high stakes testing--in this case, the TOEFL iBT.

The Gamification of Continuous Assessment #1102


Sat, Feb 20, 16:30-17:50 JST | Room GL

Engagement in the classroom is one of the perennial struggles of teachers. A promising methodology to increase engagement is the use of gamification. Gamification adds game elements to a non-game situation to improve learning and engagement. However, it can be difficult for a teacher to know where to begin. The belief that programming skills are needed or that the system is too complex often prevents a teacher from engaging with a gamified approach. This workshop will focus on creating a simple paper-based gamification application to promote participation in class. It will take participants through the steps of designing a gamified system for their classroom, from the identification of behaviors that the teacher wishes to encourage to the design and deployment of reward structures. By the end of the workshop, the participants will be able to deploy their own tailored system in their classroom, be it online or in person.

KOTESOL Connections: Back to Square One – Reflective Practice in Uncertain Times #1149


Sat, Feb 20, 19:00-19:40 JST | Auxiliary Stage

2020 was a year without precedent. As educators, we were faced with unexpected challenges that forced many of us to abandon time-honored teaching methods in favor of new, unfamiliar ones that may not have always worked. Thomas S.C. Farrell’s (2016) book on reflective practice, From Trainee to Teacher, takes readers on a journey of three novice ESL teachers as they navigate their first year in the classroom. From the initial “shock,” to having to “sink or swim,” to questioning one’s teacher beliefs, the experiences of these novice teachers contain stark similarities to the experiences of many educators, both new and seasoned, within the past year. Participants will reflect on their classroom experiences in 2020 through the lens of a novice teacher. They will also be given a set of tools based on Farrell’s reflective practice framework that they can use to examine their own teaching practice more critically.

Social Gaming Session with the Busan Chapter! #1059


Sat, Feb 20, 19:00-21:00 JST | KOTESOL Room

Online conferences allow participants a chance to continue to grow professionally by attending virtual presentations and panels, but does not allow for the traditional wine and cheese mixers, dinners, and other social gatherings associated with conferences. Through the use of Zoom and a couple of online games, the KOTESOL Busan-Gyeongnam Chapter would like to invite conference participants to an online social event from the safety and convenience of their own homes. Busan-Gyeongnam will play host to those that want to socialize with colleagues, experiment with online social games, or just want to be around other people. Different Zoom breakout rooms with different games (via social networking sites and games offered across platforms) will be offered. Attendees need not worry about their skill level or experience when it comes to games, but they must have access to Zoom on a computer and an additional smartphone or tablet.

The KOTESOL Busan-Gyeongnam Chapter Officers are Anika Casem (President), Daniel Jones (Treasurer), Kirsten Razzaq (Secretary), Rhea Metituk (Membership Officer), and Brittany Cardamone (Webmaster). Cumulatively, they have been in South Korea and teaching for over 40 years and have taught the gamut of elementary to adults in the private and public setting.

Korean Film: Hanyeo / The Housemaid (1960) #1175


Sat, Feb 20, 21:00-23:00 JST | Main Stage

Join conference chair Michael Free as we offer a chance to view some classic Korean films. These are all available free of charge via the Korean Film Archive's YouTube channel. After some brief introductory remarks, you can sit back and relax after a hard day of conferencing and watch a Korean classic. Though not R-rated, this film is not suitable for children.

Hanyeo, or The Housemaid, is a melodrama (sometimes classified as a thriller, or even horror) movie from 1960.

Synopsis: "After his pregnant wife gets tired working at home, Dong-sik Kim hires a housemaid to help his wife with the household chores. However, the housemaid turns out to be more than they bargained for."

Creating Corpus-Based Materials #1008


Sun, Feb 21, 09:30-10:10 JST | Auxiliary Stage

Corpora are powerful tools that can help students drastically improve their language skills. This workshop will show participants how to create and analyze corpus-based materials. It will mainly focus on collocations, connotations, frames, and areas of usage. It will focus on how to effectively use the Sketch Engine for Language Learning and the COCA corpus.

The Burnout Workshop: Strategies to Help Heal the Burn #1068


Sun, Feb 21, 09:30-10:50 JST | Room GJ

Burnout is a common experience among many EFL instructors, but it is relatively unknown how to ease, prevent, or eliminate burnout. The objective of this workshop is to provide a variety of strategies that teachers can use to alleviate their feelings of burnout. These strategies have been collected from scholars such as Christina Maslach, Michael Leiter, Richard Davidson, and Tammy Gregersen, in addition to the valuable knowledge and experiences shared by real teachers in their own published works. Strategies collected are broken down into five categories, including authentic self-care, self-awareness and improvement, relationships, technology, and books. Participants will engage in four different interactions. Each interaction will provide an opportunity for participants to think about the practical application of these strategies at home and in the workplace using the provided workbook. The workshop will conclude with a reflective activity in which each teacher will create their own burnout recovery plan.

Increasing Authenticity and Motivation in an EFL Oral Presentation Class #1091


Sun, Feb 21, 10:30-10:55 JST | Room DRJ

This study explored the benefits of language authenticity between non-native speakers and native speakers through computer-mediated communication. The concept of authenticity is to expose learners to “real English with intrinsically communicative quality” (Lee, 1995, p. 324). This study included twenty-three EFL college students who presented in English to native speakers of English and bilingual speakers with a near native-speaking English proficiency for six weeks. Data were collected from the synchronous interaction recordings, reflective essays, and oral evaluation rubrics. Content analysis was adopted to analyze body language, pronunciation, content, fluency, grammar, structure, linking language, and interaction with the audience. The results showed that the authentic interaction for participants was positive on the following language learning factors: motivation, preparation, willingness to communicate, language anxiety, vocabulary, and intercultural understanding. The study has implications for creating more authentic language learning and development through computer-mediated communication.

Interactive and Engaging Activities for the Online (or Offline) Classroom #1029


Sun, Feb 21, 11:00-11:40 JST | KOTESOL Room

In this hands-on workshop, participants will learn some interactive and fun activities designed for the online or hybrid classroom. These activities can also be used in person if students have computers. Participants will have the opportunity to try out the activities and discuss how they may be adapted and applied to different learning contexts. Activities include radio dramas, collaborative quiz making, and other “games” that can be played in any learning platform such as Microsoft Teams, Moodle, or Schoology. All activities are designed to achieve language outcomes related to grammar, reading comprehension, or vocabulary.

Successful Scaffolding Tasks for Teacher, Peer, and Self Writing Assessments #1101


Sun, Feb 21, 11:00-11:40 JST | Room RR

Language teachers have used various mobile applications in technology-mediated approaches to improve writing skills, both through in-person and remote settings. Recently though, amidst the coronavirus pandemic, teachers have realized the importance of synchronous and asynchronous mobile applications to foster a more responsive learning environment. Specifically, software applications for video self-recordings to assess writing performance have been used as leverage to effectively engage students beyond the classroom through a scrutiny of their own learnings, thoughts, and actions (Ong, 2000). This presentation offers successful, classroom-tested ways to meaningfully use asynchronous scaffolding writing tasks through digital portfolios in promoting more self-directed learning via teacher feedback, peer review, and self-assessment (Flavell, 1979). Practical classroom steps on how to guide students in self-monitoring their own progress, in constructing meaning from content learned and from the process of learning it, and applying learnings to other settings will be highlighted.

The Great Blind Spot: Finance Ed! #1041


Sun, Feb 21, 13:00-13:25 JST | Room GL

There is a major blind-spot in the education system: financial education! Schools have addressed almost every manner of practical life, from PE and sex ed to driver's ed and cooking classes. These classes have yielded positive results for students. But even the most basic financial education has been ignored, and the results of this failure on the part of the education system are widespread and devastating. More people struggle financially than not. This need not be the case! In this presentation, I shall first reveal and analyze how and why financial distress is more common than financial security. In the second part, I will offer basic education and tips for how to achieve financial stability. Finally, I shall offer tips and ideas for how to incorporate basic financial education into lessons for various student levels.

Bridging the Gap: Academic English for Pre-intermediate – Intermediate Learners #1117


Sun, Feb 21, 13:00-13:25 JST | Room GHE

These days, many students need to study academic English before they are at an advanced level. Teachers are expected to help develop academic literacy skills in students who have not yet had the chance to build a strong foundation of English proficiency. This presentation will focus on the classroom realities of effectively teaching lower-proficiency students (< CEFR B2) in time-limited, academic contexts and how teachers meet these challenges. To explore what techniques and approaches teachers use for teaching academic English in high-expectation settings, practices backed by research findings (e.g., corpus-determined academic word lists) were gauged by how much impact and acceptance they had among self-reported academic English teachers working with pre-intermediate and intermediate level learners. Quantitative data was used to see what experienced teachers do in the classroom to help learners be academic users of English while a deductive reasoning approach was used to examine why certain classroom techniques pervade.

EMI in Conflict-Affected Contexts: Critiques and Emerging Possibilities #1035


Sun, Feb 21, 13:00-14:30 JST | Main Stage

There are few studies examining the role of English in universities in conflict-affected contexts. Yet, English as a Medium of Instruction (EMI) is a common policy implemented by newer universities emerging in conflict zones. Drawing on data collected through interviews with university educators working in two conflict-affected contexts, Afghanistan and Somaliland, this study explores: Why do university policymakers adopt EMI policies in conflict-affected contexts? What are the limits and possibilities of EMI in conflict zones? How might EMI curriculum and pedagogy serve to ameliorate or exacerbate conflict? Data was analyzed through the lens of border cosmopolitanism. The paper will focus on sharing some initial findings from the study, and how current higher education EMI research could learn from the policies and practices of academics working in conflict-affected contexts.

English Names and L2 Motivation in the Korean EFL Classroom #1081


Sun, Feb 21, 13:30-13:55 JST | Room KR

Research suggests that the perception of one’s name is correlated with employability, likeability, academic achievement, and other important life outcomes. With names being an integral part of our identity and how we are perceived, it is important that EFL teachers understand the implications of using English names with English language learners (ELLs) and the impact it has on L2 (second language) motivation. This presentation addresses two research questions: (a) Is there a difference in L2 motivation between Korean ELLs with an English name and Korean ELLs without one? (b) How does using English names impact Korean ELLs’ L2 motivation in the Korean EFL classroom? The study included a quantitative questionnaire; interviews; and a non-randomized, controlled experiment with Korean secondary students, and it was conducted as part of a master’s level dissertation. Both the findings from the research data and implications for EFL teachers will be discussed.

The Use of the ASRI Method in Teaching English for Hospitality #999


Sun, Feb 21, 13:30-13:55 JST | Room GJ

The objective of this research was to introduce an innovation in the teaching of ESP in the hospitality context. This work was based on research and development and consisted of three stages, namely the determination of the problem stage, the design stage, and the development stage. The research used a mixed-methods approach. At the preliminary stage, verbal data were classified and analyzed qualitatively. At the design stage, the results of the analysis were applied to a design called ASRI. The ASRI method was implemented in a tourism school using an experimental group and a control group. At the development stage, the learning outcomes of the two groups were compared and analyzed quantitatively. The results of the t-test showed that the experimental group's achievement was significantly greater. Thus, the ASRI method was proven to be effective in improving the speaking skills of students in the hospitality field.

Revitalizing Students' Motivation Through Gratitude Intervention #1112


Sun, Feb 21, 14:00-14:25 JST | Auxiliary Stage

This study reports on how a gratitude-centered intervention helped to raise students’ motivation to study English between 2019 and 2020, amidst a climate of global uncertainty brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. The research involved ongoing observations of weekly basic English communication classes with a total of 300 students participating during the time period of the project. This work on gratitude is a part of broader work on positive psychology in language education, including the development of themed narrative mini-books and self-compassion workshops. In the current study, gratitude-centered concepts were first introduced in lecture style with supportive multimedia examples. Later, students engaged in gratitude activities such as co-constructing a gratitude box, a gratitude journal, and a storybook writing. Written questionnaires were also given to students towards the end of each 15-week semester. Throughout the project, motivation, attendance, attentiveness, gratitude, and "being aware of the small things" were seen to increase.

English Learning Motivation at University: EMI vs. Mother-Tongue Programs #1019


Sun, Feb 21, 14:30-14:55 JST | Room GL

Many universities offer both degrees taught in English and degrees taught in the local language. Although both programs include English classes, students’ patterns of English learning motivation likely differ depending on language use in other classes. Understanding these motivational patterns can help teachers and course designers motivate students’ learning English during university. This original research study in Macao, China, compared first-year students in English-medium (EMI) and Chinese-medium (CMI) programs at one institution. Students’ motivation and enjoyment using English were measured three times over the year. Results show that for students in both EMI and CMI programs, enjoyment using English increased, but English learning motivation decreased, particularly for CMI students. EMI students’ demotivation was partly related to negative attitudes toward the work of studying English or discovering their English ability was sufficient to cope. Implications are given for teachers and course designers in EMI and mother-tongue programs.

From Linguistic Challenges to Classroom Activities: Preparing EIL Hosts for Visitors #1051


Sun, Feb 21, 15:30-15:55 JST | Auxiliary Stage

Through the lens of English as an international language (EIL), this study investigates linguistic challenges university students and tour guides in Thailand have when hosting foreign visitors, and how those challenges can be addressed in classroom activities. A questionnaire was distributed to 113 university students and 70 tour guides. Additionally, interviews with 7 students and 2 tour guides were employed for data triangulation. It was found that the participants had problems with specialized vocabulary, especially those related to architecture and Thai culture. Visitors’ accents and low language ability also hindered the success in hosting visitors. A two-hour session incorporating EIL tenets of communication strategies and inter-cultural sensitivity that addressed those linguistic challenges was implemented with 30 students. This study hopes to provide insights into commonly found linguistic problems for visitor hosts. These can be considerations for English for Tourism course designers and teachers.

My Student Just Wants to Chat! Are They Learning Anything? #1113


Sun, Feb 21, 15:30-15:55 JST | Room GJ

This is a presentation of my own research into online 1:1 general-purpose speaking classes with adults. I'll present a few recorded extracts of moments when a correction or repair-initiation was launched and encountered trouble. First, we'll analyze these extracts through a traditional SLA lens and then analyze the same extracts through a more social/ethnomethodological lens (as is the trend in many journals these days), compare the findings, and consider which approach is more relevant to different contexts.

William Owens / William Owens /

The Problem of Native-Speakerism: Why Haven't We Resolved This? #1040


Sun, Feb 21, 15:30-18:00 JST | Main Stage

The "Conference Chair's Panel" is an initiative of this year's conference that we hope will become a tradition. It will take an issue of particular importance or interest to the Conference Chair, and gather some experts to discuss it. This year, the topic is Native-Speakerism.

Why Native-Speakerism? Because it's important? Yes. Because it's a complex issue? Yes, that too. It's not because it hasn't been discussed, and neither is it because ELT professionals don't realise native-speakerism is a problem. It's because we — with the 'we' being ELT professionals —haven't resolved this issue to most people's satisfaction. Fortunately, all four members of this panel are all well-equipped to talk about the issue, with each bringing a different perspective. The question that serves as our point of departure will open up into a dialogue that will hopefully offer some fresh insights and take us further down the road to resolving this important problem.

Panel Members: Marek Kiczkowiak Robert Lowe Hyun-jung Shin Varinder Unlu Angie White

Moderator: Michael Free

Intercultural Education Through Educational Drama and Theatre Techniques #1120


Sun, Feb 21, 16:00-16:25 JST | Room LMH

This presentation is about how we can use educational drama and theatre techniques in order to promote human rights and intercultural education in English language teaching. It is an undeniable fact that drama and theatre empower students to understand their world through exploring roles and situations and develop students’ verbal and non-verbal, individual and social communication skills. In this presentation, we will be presented with ideas that can be used in both virtual and physical classes about educational drama and theatre techniques like forum theatre, image theatre, flashbacks and flashforwards, puppetry, story circles, Conscience Alley, and many more aiming to promote effective learning and creative use of the target language while teaching students about human rights, respect, and no-hate speech while contributing to intercultural education in English teaching lessons.

Talking to Myself: Enhancing Fluency in Spontaneous Speech Through Soliloquizing #1010


Sun, Feb 21, 16:00-16:25 JST | Room GHE

Soliloquizing has been identified as oral fluency training practice in Chinese after-school settings. Nevertheless, the actual potency of soliloquizing has not been established; in particular, whether soliloquizing is effective in promoting EFL learners’ fluency in spontaneous speech has yet to be validated. This study set out to establish the efficacy of soliloquizing in promoting spontaneous speaking fluency and to explore its optimal implementation setting(s). 31 EFL undergraduates were randomly assigned to four soliloquizing conditions, which differed in terms of time-pressure and restriction of filler words. To examine participants’ gains under the four soliloquizing conditions, their pruned speech rates before and after the treatment were cross-compared. Additionally, questionnaires and interviews were administered to these participants to probe their experience with soliloquizing. Analysis showed that soliloquizing effectively enhanced the participants’ affect and fluency gains, albeit to different extents under different implementation conditions.

Communication with a Mission: Re-envisioning College English for Sustainability #1119


Sun, Feb 21, 16:30-17:10 JST | Room GK

This workshop addresses three problems that teachers face in online teaching: lack of authentic communication opportunities, boring topics for essays, and difficulty embedding a service-learning component. The first part of the workshop describes the syllabus of the course Purposive Communication: Communication with a Mission. The second part is hands-on practice with embedding SDGs, service learning, and an interdisciplinary approach in syllabus design. The last part summarizes lessons learned from re-envisioning college English.

Teaching English for Special Purposes with (Self-Developed) Corpora #1116


Sun, Feb 21, 16:30-17:50 JST | Room GJ

Language for special purposes can pose a challenge on multiple levels. This workshop will introduce the potential, methods, and ease of applying both self-compiled and already-available (collections of) texts and concordancing tools in the language classroom. We will show how corpora can be easily and quickly analyzed with freely available software for in-class data-driven learning and informed materials development that can complement the language curriculum as well as self- and remedial teaching. Drawing on concrete examples from two genres, namely legal documents and cookbooks, we shall see how such tools can reveal a plethora of information about the lexis, grammar, information structure, and cultural associations in the genres investigated, which often differ from the conventions and principles of “general English." The concrete examples from culinary and legal English will demonstrate the pertinence and ecological validity of corpus-driven learning that can go far beyond the relevance of the coursebook.

Graduate Student Showcase Roundtable #1145


Sun, Feb 21, 19:00-20:00 JST | Main Stage

A roundtable discussion of issues and importance to current graduate students.

Participants:

Ehean Kim Matt French Fitri Gebers Gizem Genç Antonina Nemtinova Robin Maurice Charlotte Otto Otto Helmut Kirsten Razzaq Michael Berichon

Re-envisioning ELT Through the Lens of Digital Literacies #1079


Sun, Feb 21, 20:00-21:00 JST | Main Stage

New technologies have become pervasive in the way people live, learn and communicate, challenging our values and norms in language education and literacy. With the pandemic exposing existing digital gaps and divisions, there is now both the urgency and the momentum among language educators to embrace new technologies. However, is technology alone really the answer?

This plenary will re-envision English Language Teaching through the lens of digital literacies. It will argue that as communication is becoming increasingly multimodal, language students need new literacies to read, listen, view, comprehend, and critique complex information online. Language education cannot ignore the extensive changes to literacy that take place in this multimodal world and assume a key role in helping students to navigate it. This will lead to a final discussion in which we will attempt to draw some practical conclusions about the way forward.

Sophia Mavridi is a Digital Learning Specialist & Lecturer in English Language Learning at De Montfort University (UK). Her research focuses on online learning and the increasingly important role of digital literacies in language education. As a consultant, Sophia supports institutions and teachers to integrate technology in a pedagogically sound way and has trained for major organisations around the world. She is a regular keynote speaker at international conferences and the joint-coordinator of the IATEFL Learning Technologies Special Interest Group. Her latest publications are 'English for 21st Century Skills' (Express Publishing, 2020) and 'Digital Innovations and Research in Language Learning' (IATEFL, 2020), both of which reflect her keen interest in innovative pedagogies in language education.

Korea Film: Sopyonje #1177


Sun, Feb 21, 21:00-23:00 JST | Main Stage

Join conference chair Michael Free as we offer a chance to view some classic Korean films. These are all available free of charge via the Korean Film Archive's YouTube channel. After some brief introductory remarks, you can sit back and relax after a hard day of conferencing and watch a Korean classic.

Sopyonje is a 1993 musical drama. It was directed by Im Kwon-taek, and tells us of a family of traditional musicians trying to make a living.

You can read about the importance of this film here: http://blog.lareviewofbooks.org/the-korea-blog/seopyeonje-surprise-art-house-megahit-showed-korea-forgotten-culture/

Google Education Training (Korean Session / 한국어 세션 ) #1132


Mon, Feb 22, 11:30-16:30 JST

*** NOTE: This session takes place in Google Meet and uses a variety of Google tools. Please make sure you have a Google account before you join! ***

Google Education Group Gyeonggi-do ~ GEG-GG presents

Tools-Tips-and-Tricks for Google-using Educators

What’s your learning objective? There’s definitely a tool to use, a technique to employ, and a fellow teacher who is ready to help you! Welcome to GEG-GG! Our group of highly energetic, engaging educators use Google-based tools to improve as professionals while accomplishing classroom goals. Most importantly, we discuss ways to make the learner have a more memorable, fun, authentic, and rigorous learning experience. Over the course of two days, participants will go through the same sessions that are normally done to become a qualified GCE - Google Certified Educator. We will share experiences and encourage real-time interaction. Participation in these sessions can help prepare you for Level 1 certification. (Gmail, Google Drive, Docs, Slides, Forms, Sheets, Youtube, Google Sites and Google Classroom).

Monday (Korean) 11:30 am - 4:30 pm 1st hour; Lunch~Q&A hour; 3 more sessions / 3 hours: (5 hours total)

Tuesday (English) 11:30 am - 4:30 pm 1st hour; Lunch~Q&A hour; 3 more sessions / 3 hours: (5 hours total)

Hosts and Presenters

Jung Eun "Judy" Kim

Ms. Jung Eun Judy Kim is a founder and a lead researcher in Hands In Hands research center where she develops online learning systems with a focus on communicative language skills, media literacy, digital literacy, digital feedback, digital empathy, and global competence. She has been teaching English communicative language skills and training pre-service and in-service teachers for the last 22 years. Currently her research is focused on the effects of bilingualism on dementia and global education cooperation.

She is the first woman Google Certified Innovator and Trainer in Korea. And she is a Microsoft Innovative Educator Expert. She is a leader of Google Educator Group Gyeonggi. She supports shifts in pedagogy and practice through professional development, training of teachers and educators in K12 and higher education on uptake of new technology, and facilitating conversations and planning between the community, school boards, teachers, administrators, and students. She is also leading a Global educator group with 80 leaders from all over the world to connect and support educators worldwide and make the world a smaller, and better place.

James G. Rush, II

Mr. James G. Rush, II, has been working in South Korea at Luther University since fall of 2016. Beginning in 2017, he became actively involved in events for the local Yongin Chapter and Korea TESOL at the national level. Currently, James is the president of the Yongin Chapter and is part of the International Outreach Committee.

James has taught at all levels from K-to-University and has a masters degree in educational technology. He has lived, worked and instructed in numerous countries, grade-levels and cultural settings. While his position is primarily focused on the use of EFL (English as a Foreign Language), he desires to encourage students to develop as life-long-learners and critical thinkers. As a member of the Google Educator Group-Gyeonggi (GEG-GG), James desires to learn the tools to be considered a certified Google Educator.

Tech Clinic with Joe Dale (Monday) #1134


Mon, Feb 22, 17:00-18:30 JST | Main Stage

We are delighted to announce that Joe Dale, an edtech specialist based in the UK, will be leading a number of tech clinics during KOTESOL 2021!

Joe’s sessions will be focused around any edtech questions and issues you are having, both in general and specifically during the pandemic. If you are interested in attending one of Joe’s clinics, we invite you to send in your questions and he will suggest some practical solutions that should help to improve your practice. His considerable experience in this area (see his bio below) means that he will be able to provide quality, substantive advice — and if he doesn't know the answer straight away, he'll find it!

These sessions will last for 90 minutes, and will be custom-tailored to each group. They will also be small sessions, with attendance capped at 20. For sessions to run there needs to be a minimum of 10 participants. You may sign up for a maximum of 2 sessions.

Session Timetable (subject to minimum sign-up of 10 participants; subject to change)

Monday, February 22 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Tuesday, February 23 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Wednesday, February 24 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Thursday, February 25 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Friday, February 26 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

Registration and question submission will be done via an electronic form that will be accessible shortly.

Yongin-Gyeonggi Chapter Virtual Welcome Table and Symposium #1168


Mon, Feb 22, 19:00-22:30 JST | KOTESOL Room

Join us as we discuss the opening keynote and happenings up through Monday afternoon. What sessions did you attend? What ideas, questions, and wonders do you have? What is your plan for the remainder of the conference? More to the point, this is a “socially professional” space for us to have guided conversations about camps during the breaks (adjusting to levels), podcasting, digital citizenship/literacy, and tech tips.

***** Welcome Table Poetic Catalyst

Drop by, say “hi," ask why / share the word you heard from Gerd / make a rhyme, spend some time / sip some tea, virtually / make a friend, ‘cause in the end / this table is set altogether to get / us all together, and you can bet / this conference will be / so much better with you, here with me.

***** SCHEDULE

7~7:05 p.m. Welcome ~ Overview (James Rush II)

7:05-7:25 p.m. Panel: Fri~Weekend-Mon summary Insights/Questions

7:25-7:40 p.m. Podcasting: Q & A, Future Plans and Considerations (Greg Lewis)

7:50-9:00 p.m. Kids on Zoom: What Worked; What Didn’t (Martin Todd, Bien Gruber, David Berry)

9:00-9:30 p.m. Tech Tips Sharing/Writing (David Kim)

***** ABSTRACTS

* 7:25-7:40 p.m. Podcasting: Q & A, Future Plans and Considerations (Greg Lewis)

What started out as an idea within the chapter has allowed for a lot of good discussions, interaction, and considerations. This general topic can go in any number of directions. The main goal is to share ideas while explaining the challenges and successes so far.

* 7:50-9:00 p.m. Kids on Zoom: What Worked; What Didn’t (Martin Todd, Bien Gruber, David Berry)

Due to the COVID pandemic, the regular storm of English camps was not held offline in the summer of 2020; but Yonsei University hosted a Zoom English camp, which they re-hosted again in the winter, as some other camps either returned offline or began using Zoom. The presenters will talk about the unique set of issues they encountered as they landed on the front line of the collapsed (offline) Mapo-Yonsei English Camp and re-imagined it on the fly as a remote educational adventure: what they tried; what worked; what didn’t.

* 9:00-9:30 p.m. Tech Tips Sharing/Writing (David Kim)

Digital citizenship has three major themes and nine principles. This brief session will be introducing these as a way to connect with one another. It may be a bit odd and a somewhat different way to approach a topic, but in the end, the goal is to be professionally social and gain an awareness of one's digital footprint.

Google Education Training (English Session) #1133


Tue, Feb 23, 11:30-16:30 JST

*** NOTE: This session takes place in Google Meet and uses a variety of Google tools. Please make sure you have a Google account before you join! ***

Google Education Group Gyeonggi-do ~ GEG-GG presents

Tools-Tips-and-Tricks for Google-using Educators

What’s your learning objective? There’s definitely a tool to use, a technique to employ, and a fellow teacher who is ready to help you! Welcome to GEG-GG! Our group of highly energetic, engaging educators use Google-based tools to improve as professionals while accomplishing classroom goals. Most importantly, we discuss ways to make the learner have a more memorable, fun, authentic, and rigorous learning experience. Over the course of two days, participants will go through the same sessions that are normally done to become a qualified GCE - Google Certified Educator. We will share experiences and encourage real-time interaction. Participation in these sessions can help prepare you for Level 1 certification. (Gmail, Google Drive, Docs, Slides, Forms, Sheets, Youtube, Google Sites and Google Classroom).

Monday (Korean) 11:30 am - 4:30 pm 1st hour; Lunch~Q&A hour; 3 more sessions / 3 hours: (5 hours total)

Tuesday (English) 11:30 am - 4:30 pm 1st hour; Lunch~Q&A hour; 3 more sessions / 3 hours: (5 hours total)

Hosts and Presenters

Jung Eun "Judy" Kim

Ms. Jung Eun Judy Kim is a founder and a lead researcher in Hands In Hands research center where she develops online learning systems with a focus on communicative language skills, media literacy, digital literacy, digital feedback, digital empathy, and global competence. She has been teaching English communicative language skills and training pre-service and in-service teachers for the last 22 years. Currently her research is focused on the effects of bilingualism on dementia and global education cooperation.

She is the first woman Google Certified Innovator and Trainer in Korea. And she is a Microsoft Innovative Educator Expert. She is a leader of Google Educator Group Gyeonggi. She supports shifts in pedagogy and practice through professional development, training of teachers and educators in K12 and higher education on uptake of new technology, and facilitating conversations and planning between the community, school boards, teachers, administrators, and students. She is also leading a Global educator group with 80 leaders from all over the world to connect and support educators worldwide and make the world a smaller, and better place.

James G. Rush, II

Mr. James G. Rush, II, has been working in South Korea at Luther University since fall of 2016. Beginning in 2017, he became actively involved in events for the local Yongin Chapter and Korea TESOL at the national level. Currently, James is the president of the Yongin Chapter and is part of the International Outreach Committee.

James has taught at all levels from K-to-University and has a masters degree in educational technology. He has lived, worked and instructed in numerous countries, grade-levels and cultural settings. While his position is primarily focused on the use of EFL (English as a Foreign Language), he desires to encourage students to develop as life-long-learners and critical thinkers. As a member of the Google Educator Group-Gyeonggi (GEG-GG), James desires to learn the tools to be considered a certified Google Educator.

Tech Clinic with Joe Dale (Tuesday) #1135


Tue, Feb 23, 17:00-18:30 JST | Main Stage

We are delighted to announce that Joe Dale, an edtech specialist based in the UK, will be leading a number of tech clinics during KOTESOL 2021!

Joe’s sessions will be focused around any edtech questions and issues you are having, both in general and specifically during the pandemic. If you are interested in attending one of Joe’s clinics, we invite you to send in your questions and he will suggest some practical solutions that should help to improve your practice. His considerable experience in this area (see his bio below) means that he will be able to provide quality, substantive advice — and if he doesn't know the answer straight away, he'll find it! These sessions will last for 90 minutes, and will be custom-tailored to each group. They will also be small sessions, with attendance capped at 20. For sessions to run there needs to be a minimum of 10 participants. You may sign up for a maximum of 2 sessions.

Session Timetable (subject to minimum sign-up of 10 participants; subject to change)

Monday, February 22 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Tuesday, February 23 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Wednesday, February 24 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Thursday, February 25 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Friday, February 26 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

Registration and question submission will be done via an electronic form that will be accessible shortly.

KOTESOL Connections: Promoting Korea TESOL through a Pandemic and Beyond #1150


Tue, Feb 23, 19:00-19:45 JST | Room WJF

How did you hear about Korea TESOL? If the Publicity Committee has been successful, then you heard about it through one of their promotions: a social media graphic, a YouTube video, an article in a Korean newspaper, or an interview on a podcast. The committee continually strives to bring more passionate educators to conferences and encourage memberships. In this workshop, learn how the Publicity Committee promoted KOTESOL pre-pandemic, how the game changed in 2020, and how to get involved if you love publicity as much as they do. There will be ample opportunities to share and discuss new ideas for promoting KOTESOL via breakout groups.

Roundtable for Cross-Cultural Collaboration Between Korea and Japan #1030


Tue, Feb 23, 19:00-20:00 JST | KOTESOL Room

This roundtable features speakers who have experience in research or teaching in both Korea and Japan, or facilitating or collaborating between the two countries. After brief opening remarks, the session will be open to participants for discussion and networking. This session aims to bring leaders, researchers, and teachers in Korea and Japan together with the goal of working in closer collaboration.

Speaker 1 (Dawn Lucovich), Professional and Community Development: I will discuss how professional organizations and their members in Korea and Japan can work together to create mutually beneficial opportunities.

Speaker 2 (Miso Kim), Research: I would like to share Korean-Japanese research collaboration ideas on these topics: (a) the social significance of standardized English tests, (b) students' motivation to study English and go abroad, and (c) the feasibility and practicability of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) education.

Speaker 3 (Erin Bruni Suzuki), Teaching: I will discuss how university students, high school students, and debate coaches in Korea and Japan worked to create an online international high school parliamentary debate tournament.

Speaker 4 (Rhea Metituk), Professional and Community Development: I will share my experiences developing connections and collaborations across KOTESOL and JALT, including through events both offline and online, and through JALT's Performance In Education SIG.

Inspired Imaginings: Exploring the Future of TEYL #1074


Tue, Feb 23, 20:00-21:00 JST | Main Stage

To mark the pearl anniversary of the IATEFL Young Learners and Teenagers Special Interest Group in 2016, Carol Read contributed a special centerpiece entitled An ABC of changes in primary English language teaching and learning over the last 30 years. This fascinating overview unpacks how historical developments have influenced and shaped current TEYL practices.

My plenary takes its inspiration from Carol’s centerpiece by focusing on five of her ‘ABCs’ and imagining ways that they might develop over the next 30 years - and beyond.

Specifically, I will shine a light on these TEYL areas:

C is for Curriculum K is for Kindergarten S is for Special Educational Needs and Disability U is for Use of Technology X is for Xpertise

My explorations are inspired by over two decades of engagement in TEYL as a classroom practitioner, materials creator, teacher educator as well as my current PhD research. I am especially looking forward to interacting with conference participants to discover how far my predictions resonate with colleagues’ ideas on the future of TEYL.

David Valente is the Coordinator of the IATEFL Young Learners and Teenagers Special Interest Group. He works as a PhD Research Fellow in English Language and Literature Subject Pedagogy at Nord University, Norway, where he teaches on the 5-year Master's degree in Primary Education. David has over 20 years' experience in ELT as a teacher, teacher educator, academic manager, author and editor. His specialist interests include children's literature in ELT, primary and secondary teacher education and intercultural learning. David is also one of the authors of the Cambridge University Press FUN Skills series.

Korean Film: Kongjui & Patchui (1978) #1178


Tue, Feb 23, 21:00-23:00 JST | Main Stage

Join Conference Chair Michael Free for another night of Korean cinema!

Tonight, following David Valente's plenary on young learners, we will view a film that is suitable for the whole family: Kongjui & Patchui. If you read this synopsis on Wikipedia, you'll immediately recognize this traditional story's similarity to a certain Western folk tale: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kongjwi_and_Patjwi

Tech Clinic with Joe Dale (Wednesday) #1136


Wed, Feb 24, 17:00-18:30 JST | Main Stage

We are delighted to announce that Joe Dale, an edtech specialist based in the UK, will be leading a number of tech clinics during KOTESOL 2021!

Joe’s sessions will be focused around any edtech questions and issues you are having, both in general and specifically during the pandemic. If you are interested in attending one of Joe’s clinics, we invite you to send in your questions and he will suggest some practical solutions that should help to improve your practice. His considerable experience in this area (see his bio below) means that he will be able to provide quality, substantive advice — and if he doesn't know the answer straight away, he'll find it! These sessions will last for 90 minutes, and will be custom-tailored to each group. They will also be small sessions, with attendance capped at 20. For sessions to run there needs to be a minimum of 10 participants. You may sign up for a maximum of 2 sessions.

Session Timetable (subject to minimum sign-up of 10 participants; subject to change)

Monday, February 22 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Tuesday, February 23 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Wednesday, February 24 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Thursday, February 25 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Friday, February 26 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

Registration and question submission will be done via an electronic form that will be accessible shortly.

Gwangju-Jeonnam Chapter Presents: As Time Goes By: Revisiting Some Familiar ELT Questions #1154


Wed, Feb 24, 18:30-19:10 JST | KOTESOL Room

** Free and open to all! **

This session will reconsider some important questions already familiar to English teachers.

Should we let students use L1? Should we use it ourselves? How can we motivate disinterested students? How useful are our class activities, really? EFL teachers are sure to meet these questions, and many more. As our experience broadens, we develop a sense of our answers. Our philosophies grow, evolve, and deepen.

With this in mind, this session will challenge attendees to re-examine some of these ‘old’ questions in order to reflect on what we believe now, how we got here, and where we might go next. Attendees will reflect on three important themes in ELT: L1 in the classroom, student motivation, and activity effectiveness. Attendees will gain insight into their own beliefs and practices, and the presenter will offer some of his own ideas along with a smattering of theory, casting some new light on perennial issues.

Gwangju-Jeonnam Chapter Presents: Redefining Homework: Finding Self-Study Solutions #1155


Wed, Feb 24, 19:20-20:00 JST | KOTESOL Room

** Free and open to all! **

Most students don’t like homework. “Homework” often suggests tedious busywork. Many students rush homework, focused on what they can do afterwards. Some teachers give rewards for “finishing” homework.

But what if homework became a reward unto itself?

Using self-study solutions, learners can become proactive in meeting their own goals. They can also become more aware of progress.

Language learning is a monumental task, with countless things to remember. The cycle of learning and forgetting can be extremely demotivating. Self-study helps to strengthen memory, but it can feel boring, lonely, and frustrating. What can be done about this?

This presentation will focus on finding the right self-study solutions to motivate learners. Spaced repetition and human memory will be discussed. Participants will discuss their own experiences, and compare different self-study tools including Memrise, Quizlet, and Anki. Other self-study tools and unique ideas, such as LCD writing boards, will also be explored.

Gwangju-Jeonnam Chapter Presents: Re-envisioning Authentic Materials Together #1156


Wed, Feb 24, 20:10-20:50 JST | KOTESOL Room

** Free and open to all! **

Authentic materials are often lauded, but seemingly rarely used. Have you ever wanted to use authentic materials in your classroom but were not sure how to? Are you unsure about what exactly an authentic material is? The purpose of the workshop is to help participants reflect on their usage or possible usage of authentic materials in their own contexts.

First, we will discuss what exactly authentic materials are, and their advantages and disadvantages. Next, we will play “Authentic or Not”, with participants deciding whether or not something is an authentic material. Finally we will move onto a broader discussion wherein participants can share exemplary authentic materials they have used and how they used them in their classes, and other resources that may be useful in selecting or presenting said materials. Participants will leave this workshop with new perspectives on authentic materials and ways they can be used.

Gwangju-Jeonnam Chapter Presents: Using Creative Constraints in Speaking-Based Activities #1157


Wed, Feb 24, 21:00-21:40 JST | KOTESOL Room

** Free and open to all! **

Role-plays and dialogues can be fun production tasks that spark students’ creativity while also encouraging movement in the classroom. However, many students (especially those less academically-inclined) may be quick to throw up their hands and say “I have no idea” or “I’m not creative.” It’s a common problem that can derail creative dialogue activities.

The key to creative breakthroughs can start with setting restrictions or boundaries - creative constraints. By setting initial limits on role-playing possibilities, students can find more creative freedom - a kind of “jumping-off point.” As teachers, we can turn these dials to scale speaking activities to students’ language abilities and promote more creativity in our classrooms.

Gwangju-Jeonnam Chapter Presents: "Play It Again, 쌤!" Closing Zoom Social and Dance Party #1158


Wed, Feb 24, 21:40-22:30 JST | KOTESOL Room

** Free and open to all! **

This evening’s special lineup from the Gwangju-Jeonnam KOTESOL Chapter will conclude with a relaxed social event over Zoom. Please join us to mingle, chat, and have fun! Stewart Gray has promised to do a little DJing to set the mood for us, and he may be open to requests.

Tech Clinic with Joe Dale (Thursday) #1137


Thu, Feb 25, 17:00-18:30 JST | Main Stage

We are delighted to announce that Joe Dale, an edtech specialist based in the UK, will be leading a number of tech clinics during KOTESOL 2021!

Joe’s sessions will be focused around any edtech questions and issues you are having, both in general and specifically during the pandemic. If you are interested in attending one of Joe’s clinics, we invite you to send in your questions and he will suggest some practical solutions that should help to improve your practice. His considerable experience in this area (see his bio below) means that he will be able to provide quality, substantive advice — and if he doesn't know the answer straight away, he'll find it! These sessions will last for 90 minutes, and will be custom-tailored to each group. They will also be small sessions, with attendance capped at 20. For sessions to run there needs to be a minimum of 10 participants. You may sign up for a maximum of 2 sessions.

Session Timetable (subject to minimum sign-up of 10 participants; subject to change)

Monday, February 22 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Tuesday, February 23 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Wednesday, February 24 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Thursday, February 25 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Friday, February 26 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

Registration and question submission will be done via an electronic form that will be accessible shortly.

KOTESOL Connections: Diversity Panel #1151


Thu, Feb 25, 19:00-20:00 JST | KOTESOL Room

KOTESOL members come from diverse backgrounds and identities with varied concerns and interests. This panel is meant to explore the successes and challenges our members experience based on that diversity, as well as how KOTESOL hopes to improve in the future. In turn, KOTESOL Special Interest Groups [SIGs] under the social justice umbrella will offer insights, followed by discussions of related questions in breakout rooms, to which all participants are invited.

Representation and Diversity in KOTESOL Membership

[KOTESOL Social Justice SIG] Jocelyn Wright:

Being ‘researching associations’ is becoming a bit of a trend these days among language teaching associations. From the social justice perspective, an interesting theme to explore within an organization is the issue of representation and diversity of membership. What is it we actually know about our members? What might we guess based on available data? What do we not know? To understand representation and diversity within KOTESOL, answering these questions is a good starting point for further reflection and action.

Bolstering Women and Gender Equity

[KOTESOL Women and Gender Equality SIG] Rhea Metituk & Anika Casem:

Gender equity issues affect our students, and teachers in Korea, as well as the society we are immersed in. As global citizens and as teachers in Korea, what strategies can be applied to address these issues? This presentation will review steps taken by the group initiatives, as well as shed light on areas needing attention and a call to action.

Increasing Diverse Voices Within KOTESOL

[KOTESOL People of Color SIG] Kara Waggoner & Anika Casem:

While we might not know the exact numbers, the number of diverse members within KOTESOL seems to be decreasing in recent years. This is at a disservice to us as an organization because we are missing out on their unique perspectives and the experiences they bring. This part of the panel discussion will look at ways we can make teachers of color feel welcome and invited into KOTESOL.

Covid and the Climate: Unequal effects, similar opportunities

[KOTESOL Environmental Justice SIG] Julian Warmington & Rhea Metituk:

We will review what the Environmental Justice group has achieved so far, preview current plans going forward, and discuss how the Covid 19 era has altered both. We will also discuss why the pandemic era is crucially important for us all as citizens of the global village. We will end with a talk about roles and openness to change and input from all.

The Future of Teaching English with Technology #1073


Thu, Feb 25, 20:00-21:00 JST | Main Stage

At a webinar last year, an audience member asked a question: “Will language teachers be replaced by technology?” I confidently answered with a big "No". Yet, the question lingers. Surviving almost one year teaching language online, today I am convinced that some language teachers will not be replaced by technology — but others will.

In this talk, I will discuss how technology has been used and how it will continue shaping our job as language teachers. Reflecting on my own teaching experience and exploring the potentials of technology, I will also discuss how future language teachers can teach English with technology.

To be able to successfully teach English with technology, we will need to stop seeing technology as a powerful tool that brings about definite results without considering how it is used.

We need to go beyond finding out whether an app is effective for learning or teaching grammar, vocabulary, or pronunciation, for instance. We need to consider that technology is not merely an instrument we use to serve language teaching purposes. It has penetrated our lives so deeply in many different ways that its use has changed the way we teach and the way language learners learn.

Francisca Maria Ivone currently teaches at the Department of English, Universitas Negeri Malang in Indonesia. She has a Bachelor of Education from IKIP Malang, Indonesia, and a Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in Applied Linguistics from The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. She researches and publishes in the area of ELT, TELL, CALL, Extensive Listening and Viewing (EL/V), Extensive Reading (ER), learning autonomy, and collaborative learning. She is passionate about the use of technology in language teaching and learning. She also gives training to pre-service and in-service teachers on the use of technology in language teaching and learning, ER, and EL/V.

Technology and Language Assessment: Considerations and Consequences #1037


Thu, Feb 25, 21:00-23:00 JST | Main Stage

Technology is rapidly changing language assessment in a number of ways. Brought about at least partially by the pandemic, we at the British Council’s East Asia Assessment Solutions Team have been involved in numerous projects related to technology and language assessment. In this panel discussion, we will discuss the considerations and consequences of the following projects: remote proctoring development, test-taking strategies in automated assessment, the implications of automated assessment on English as a Lingua Franca, visual literacy in an automated environment, summative assessment in an online setting, the impact of affective factors on remote speaking assessment, as well as an evaluation of an automated scoring system for a high-stakes Speaking test. The implications for the classroom, whether digital or face-to-face, will also be discussed.

Panelists: Christopher Redmond, Trevor Breakspear, Sheryl Cooke, Johnathan Cruise, Jan Langeslag, Neil Ryder, William Bayliss, Radosveta Valkova and Jonathan Dixon.

Is Phonics Instruction Important When Teaching Young Learners? How Does It Help Develop Reading Skills? #1172

Promotional Visit the MM Publications page

Fri, Feb 26, 16:00-16:40 JST | MM Publications Room

Speaker: Gregg Sotiropoulos

Phonics is a method used in schools throughout the English-speaking world to help children learn to read and spell quickly. In this session, you will get practical ideas and tips on how to best incorporate reading and phonics in your program as well as how to familiarize young learners with the sounds of the English language.

Play with Me, Please! #1087


Fri, Feb 26, 17:00-18:20 JST | Auxiliary Stage

Play is absolutely essential for human development. How can we help our students to find balance and motivation again in this difficult period of change and crisis? Playing. It's so simple and so necessary. But we need to play before them, to discover specific skills, and after be ready to give a new and daring shape to our classes. How can we do this? With playful creativity and specific exercises. This workshop will be highly interactive with slides, videos, materials, and practice.

*** Participants, please bring paper, scissors, glue, and colored pencils or markers! The presenter also recommends two or three acrylic paints in your favorite colors, one or two white sheets of paper, a shoebox or something similar, and some objects you like: ephemera, erasers, pencils, coins, fabric, etc. ***

(NOTE: Rescheduled from Feb. 21, 4-5:20 p.m.)

Tech Clinic with Joe Dale (Friday) #1138


Fri, Feb 26, 17:00-18:30 JST

We are delighted to announce that Joe Dale, an edtech specialist based in the UK, will be leading a number of tech clinics during KOTESOL 2021!

Joe’s sessions will be focused around any edtech questions and issues you are having, both in general and specifically during the pandemic. If you are interested in attending one of Joe’s clinics, we invite you to send in your questions and he will suggest some practical solutions that should help to improve your practice. His considerable experience in this area (see his bio below) means that he will be able to provide quality, substantive advice — and if he doesn't know the answer straight away, he'll find it! These sessions will last for 90 minutes, and will be custom-tailored to each group. They will also be small sessions, with attendance capped at 20. For sessions to run there needs to be a minimum of 10 participants. You may sign up for a maximum of 2 sessions.

Session Timetable (subject to minimum sign-up of 10 participants; subject to change)

Monday, February 22 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Tuesday, February 23 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Wednesday, February 24 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Thursday, February 25 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST Friday, February 26 — 5:00-6:30 p.m. KST

Registration and question submission will be done via an electronic form that will be accessible shortly.

KOTESOL Connections: All About KOTESOL Publications: What, How… #1152


Fri, Feb 26, 19:00-19:45 JST | KOTESOL Room

This session is designed to inform attendees about KOTESOL’s three main publications: the quarterly magazine The English Connection (TEC), the semi-annual Korea TESOL Journal (KTJ), and the annual KOTESOL Proceedings. In addition to merely informing attendees about our publications are aims are twofold: (a) to interest individuals in possible contributing to our publications and (b) to interest individuals into the possibility of coming on staff. For TEC, an explanation will be given of how authors are recruited and articles obtained for the issue’s theme, what copy-editing and production steps an article goes through from its submission to its publication, and what skills are required of editors. For KTJ, the call-for-papers will be explained, the different types of articles accepted will be described, and the review process will be outlined, as well as the copy-editing and production process, which closely follow APA style guidelines. KTJ also serves as a mentoring journal when that service is required. KOTESOL Proceedings are published once a year and is a collection of articles based on presentations given at the previous Korea TESOL International Conference – articles on research presentations, workshops, and poster sessions. The review, copy-editing, and production processes are similar to that of KTJ. Several of KOTESOL’s smaller, online publication opportunities will also be introduced. Substantial time will be allotted for a concluding question-and-answer session.

The More Things Change, the More they Stay the Same. #1078


Fri, Feb 26, 20:00-21:00 JST | Main Stage

When we ponder the question of how our lives are likely to change over the coming years and decades, it is tempting to let our imaginations run wild. When we think about learning foreign languages, for example, we may dream of technology that will allow us to have new languages uploaded automatically to our brains as we sleep soundly in our temperature-controlled hover-beds. Alternatively, the more pessimistic among us might live in dread of a nightmare scenario in which AI holograms render our entire profession obsolete.

It is important to remember, however, that when it comes to education, and particularly to language education in institutional settings, there are some basic elements of what we do that are unlikely to change anytime soon, if ever. Today, we have access to technologies and resources that would have been unimaginable as recently as 20 years ago, but is the way we teach and learn now really so very different from the way we did it back then? In this session, I will look at what I consider to be the fundamentals of language education and make the case that when we envision the future, it is just as important to be aware of the things we know will not change as it is to imagine all the things that might.

David Barker is the director of the English Center at Gifu University in Japan. Originally from Wales, he became a language teacher after working for two years as a police officer in Liverpool, England. He has a PhD in language education and has taught English in Singapore, New Zealand, and Japan, where he has lived for 23 years. He is the founder of BTB Press and the author of a wide range of bilingual textbooks. He is also the author of four Japanese language books about learning English, two of which became national bestsellers. His main areas of interest are cross-linguistic interference and materials development.

KOTESOL Connections: Membership Perks, Privileges, & Possibilities #1153


Fri, Feb 26, 21:00-22:00 JST | KOTESOL Room

How much do you really know about KOTESOL, its Membership Committee, and your membership benefits? Join us for a pub quiz-style challenge, and then collaborate in teams to create a "wish list" for what you'd like to see from the committee in the future!

Using Multiple Online Resources for Meaningful ELL Lesson Preparation #1048


Sat, Feb 27, 09:30-10:10 JST | Room SP

Lesson preparations for English language learners (ELLs) are different from other general students. ELLs have their own diverse characteristics, such as their educational backgrounds and first language knowledge, as well as assets, and these factors needed to be included in lesson planning. For this presentation, the presenter will first talk about factors that should be considered for lesson preparation. Strategies and supplementary materials that will make a lesson clearer and more interesting will also be presented, such as hands-on manipulatives and realia. Multiple online resources for lesson preparation will be shared during the presentation, such as PBS, News in Levels, Books that Grow, and other websites as well as video channels. The presenter will also share ideas on how to use these materials in a more applicable way. After this presentation, the audience may have a clear idea about what to use and how to use it in ELL lesson preparation.

Inducing Creativity in Young Learners: Building 21st-Century Skills Using Technology #1109


Sat, Feb 27, 09:30-10:10 JST | Room GJ

Integrating technology into the EFL education curriculum in Korea has become an increasingly important balancing act, especially in the midst of a pandemic. Research has shown various opinions on the appropriate amount of technology to integrate to create a curriculum that fosters the development of 21st-century skills that would support language development. Several studies have shown that there have been several key issues preventing teachers from fully utilizing these tools to develop students' 21st-century skills. These problematic areas include finding the right technology tool to use, teacher knowledge of technology, adaptation into the current curriculum, and administrative support. What this workshop hopes to accomplish is to provide some practical ways you can combine techniques of your own creativity and the use of technology you may currently have in your classroom. The workshop will focus on developing skills in creativity, collaboration, communication, and critical thinking for elementary school students.

Fun Writing Projects Make EFL Students Active in Classes #1124


Sat, Feb 27, 09:30-10:10 JST | Auxiliary Stage

This workshop gives attendees hands-on activities for students in the EFL classroom, not only for in-person classes but also for online classes. Regarding writing, input activities are indispensable for students to output their opinions, choices, and ideas; also, the activities should be suitable and practical. To make both input and output activities for writing, what do teachers need? This workshop will include samples of writing activities including stepped-writing, mini-debate, publication platforms such as Padlet, and classroom journals in order to offer audiences practice with such writing input and output activities. In addition, audiences will be able to use the writing activities for their own teaching contexts, either in-person or online, using these concepts. As a result, students can increase their motivation toward writing while being active through input-output activities. Written essays and other work done by students aged 13 to 17 will be shown in this workshop to illustrate the power of this writing concept.

Building Financial Health While Teaching English in Korea #1039


Sat, Feb 27, 09:30-11:00 JST | Main Stage

The last year, 2020, will go down in history.

How did your bank accounts fare?

Financially, 2020 was an excellent year for the "haves" but a terrible year for the "have-nots." The purpose of this panel is to help answer questions that our colleagues have about improving their financial health, particularly in light of the impact of COVID on an expatriate lifestyle. The panelists have experience in debt reduction, investing, building “set-asides,” F.I.R.E., retirement planning, managing pensions, passive income, Korean taxes, tax in other countries we know about, planning based on your age, life after Korea, some legal issues, etc. Our goal with this panel is to provide you with a few of our top tips to improve your financial health and then answer any questions you have regarding your individual needs and situations. Working together can help everyone's financial health improve.

Less Anxiety Is Important for Improving English Proficiency #1107


Sat, Feb 27, 10:30-10:55 JST | Room SP

The purpose of this research is to investigate the factor(s) related to improving the English proficiency of university students in student-centered communicative lessons. Eighty-eight Japanese EFL students completed a questionnaire at the middle of a semester. It included affective components such as foreign language enjoyment (FLE)/foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA) scales and some demographic components. The students took the TOEIC IP before and after the semester to check their progress on English proficiency. A logistic regression analysis was calculated to find the factor(s) involved in increasing the TOEIC scores, based on six independent variables. It was found that the factor that led to the improvement of English proficiency after the course was students' being less anxious in the middle of the semester. Teachers should make every effort to envision English classrooms together with their students by considering students’ feelings (especially anxiety) during lessons and create an unthreatening language learning environment.

Future Proof #1075


Sat, Feb 27, 11:00-12:00 JST | Main Stage

Even before the pandemic hit, I was contemplating the evolving nature of work in our profession. What does it mean to hold a “full time job”? Is freelancing something you work up to, or work to get away from? Should experience bring a higher salary for the same work, or for more responsibilities? Is an hour of teaching worth more or less than an hour of working in an office?

And then the move to online learning and teaching so many of us experienced over the last year—and continue to experience this year—led to even more questions. Should a teacher be paid according to their own local living expenses, or according to students’ local living expenses? How do we balance our need to support ourselves with our desire to support economically challenged students? How much of what we do—not just teaching but writing articles, giving webinars, professional development, and so on—should be free and how much should be paid? What are the options for someone who loves their job but feels underpaid? How can we future-proof our careers for uncertain times?

I’m not going to pretend to have the definitive answers; I don’t think there are definitive answers. But I’d like to share with you the questions I’ve used to focus and adjust my own work life and mentor others. The conversation about how we work and how much we work and what all that is worth is one we should be having, not just with ourselves and our employers but throughout our profession.

We'll let Dorothy introduce herself!

"I'm an author, editor, teacher, and teacher trainer in the field of English Language Teaching (ELT). I taught English, French, and Japanese for over 20 years in Asia, Africa, and the US. My MA in TESL is from the School for International Training in Vermont.

I currently write and edit English language teaching materials and textbooks, and conduct teacher training workshops. My areas of specialty and interest include teaching writing, teaching reading, business English, academic English, testing, and humor. I'm a frequent plenary speaker at international conferences, and in 2012 founded my own small publishing company, Wayzgoose Press, that publishes fiction, non-fiction, and of course ELT materials for teachers and students."

Reframing Language Class: Student Perceptions, Engagement, and Outcomes #1111


Sat, Feb 27, 13:00-13:25 JST | Room KR

This presentation reports on how a reframing of a language class was correlated with increased student engagement and improved language proficiency outcomes. The study was conducted with primary school learners of English as a second language, but we will discuss implications for TESOL at multiple levels. Also, we will collaboratively create ways to leverage reframing in our own teaching and learning contexts.

Why you should bring Social Media into your Classroom #1173

Promotional Visit the Black Cat Publishing page

Sat, Feb 27, 13:00-13:40 JST | Black Cat Room

Speaker: Samuel John Williams

Why you should bring Social Media into your Classroom

Social media plays such an integral role in our student’s lives, and there are a vast array of great resources on these platforms that you can easily use to supplement your English lessons. As an English teacher and social media influencer I take the classic stories from English literature and turn them into contemporary video lessons that your pupils love. Now I’m going to show you how you can use this fantastic educational social media content in your English class.

Developing a Classroom Culture of Trust During Trying Times #1007


Sat, Feb 27, 13:00-13:40 JST | Room RR

After the whirlwind of 2020, we savor simple academic mainstays: students keep studying; teachers keep teaching; we all keep learning. As educators on the ELT frontlines, let’s boldly advance, in solidarity, together. Yet with so many unknowns, are we sure students will join us? During trying times, how should we design a classroom culture that promotes student buy-in? Altogether, our classrooms must be SURE: Supportive, Unforgettable, Reliable, and Effective. To cover these bases, online or offline, trust becomes imperative. Qualitative analysis of the past four semesters, including quantitative data and written feedback from over 500 student surveys, has shaped the aims of this workshop: to highlight best practices around cultivating student trust and brainstorm classroom culture goals for 2021. Attendee input is highly encouraged. As the four SURE components are introduced through recent examples, participants will discuss and personalize the concepts in small groups. Let’s enhance our knowledge all together.

The “Mom Factor” of Korean ELT: Do we work with it, or without it? #1032


Sat, Feb 27, 13:00-14:00 JST | Main Stage

The “Mom factor” in Korea’s ELT setting, compared to the magnitude of their influence as the most critical decision maker for their children’s English learning process, has received relatively little attention in ELT. During the current pandemic, the moms of young learners have become even more influential with their strong engagement and aspiration to learn more about English education. Although this can be regarded as desirable in a general sense, it also raises concerns and issues that need discussion among ELT professionals. The phenomenon of this “Mom factor”, as well as the various advantages and challenges it brings with it, will all be discussed during my presentation.

Classroom Innovation: Addressing English Classroom Needs Through Design Thinking #1123


Sat, Feb 27, 13:30-13:55 JST | Room KR

In response to the challenges faced by the Department of Education, this study aimed to provide innovative solutions in addressing English classroom needs. The study specifically utilized design thinking (DT) to address classroom needs at the secondary level vis-a-vis open possibilities of using DT in addressing other problems. Using a qualitative research design, it utilized a single case study aimed at developing and explaining an existing problem. The study had six students and four teacher discussants from the junior high school equally representing the private- and public-school sectors. The results of the focus group discussion found that students identified problems encountered in an English language classroom. Such problems were identified as needs and became the starting point of the teacher discussants in their DT orientation and workshop. DT provides promising innovative solutions in addressing problems in the classroom and may be utilized as a process in improving academic learning.

Does Duolingo Improve Standardized Test Scores? #1042


Sat, Feb 27, 14:00-14:25 JST | Room GHE

Language learning apps are increasingly important study tools. With millions of learners worldwide, Duolingo is one of the most popular such apps. A 2012 study by Vesselinov and Grego stated that beginning learners of Spanish gained the equivalent of a semester's worth of study in 34 hours of Duolingo use. Can Japanese university students make the same gains in English? This study tested 75 first-year students with the TOEIC Bridge test, a common standardized test, before and after 14 weeks of Duolingo use. A linear regression found that the app provided only a tiny average increase to TOEIC scores, indicating that it is not highly effective. Possible reasons for this result, discrepancies between this and other studies, and suggestions for further research will be discussed.

Feedback on Student Performances During Difficult Times: ELT in ERT #1084


Sat, Feb 27, 14:00-14:40 JST | Room GJ

Because of COVID-19, many ELT teachers have had to teach classes online as ERT (emergency remote teaching). Aside from technology, three major ERT problems are motivation, class cohesion, and feedback. This workshop will introduce a performance activity, Living Newspaper Readers Theatre (LNRT), that will address these three problems. It will first describe what LNRT is and then how to do it, with examples of performances and how they build motivation and class cohesion. The latter part of the workshop will concern how to effectively give online feedback about performances. Specifically, we will show examples of rubrics and discuss how they can be used for giving students feedback, training them about what to look for when giving each other feedback, and how to articulate such feedback to peers. The examples in this workshop were optimized for ERT but can be done face-to-face, and indeed have been for the last ten years.

Conversation Class 101 #1069


Sat, Feb 27, 15:30-16:10 JST | Room AS

Have you ever walked into a university classroom full of unmotivated, low-level students who are seemingly unwilling or unable to participate in classroom activities? You are not alone. This very common problem has a simple solution. In this presentation, participants will learn how to design simple, student-centered activities that will get students talking with one another, talking with the teacher, and having fun. These activities are not only fun and engaging for university students but also a time-saving tool for busy teachers who are constantly lesson planning. This presentation focuses mainly on partner speaking activities that encourage students to use target vocabulary and add their own personally meaningful details to each answer. The end goal of this presentation is to maximize student talking time and allow students of all levels to participate meaningfully in conversation with their peers.

Facilitating Interactive Learning Online with Nearpod #1080


Sat, Feb 27, 15:30-16:10 JST | Room GL

As the coronavirus has caused many universities around the world to hold classes virtually, facilitating interactive learning online has become a new challenge among teachers. In my workshop, I will showcase the online lesson tool known as Nearpod, which I have used for two semesters for Japanese intermediate and upper-intermediate university English learners. Research has shown that Nearpod promotes active learning through its use of immediate feedback and its ability to facilitate collaborative participation between students, teachers, and lesson content (Amasha et al., 2018, Hakami, 2020). My workshop will allow teachers opportunities to see how Nearpod can be used for effective discussions, reading activities, vocabulary activities, student-paced assignments, and informing future instruction through its post-class reports feature. Finally, I will share the results of a quantitative survey of student self-reported perceptions of Nearpod, which indicated that students felt the lesson platform positively supplemented their online learning experience.

Quantitative TESOL Classroom Research in Light of the L2 Methods Reform: A Teacher-friendly Quality Checklist #1033


Sat, Feb 27, 15:30-16:30 JST | Main Stage

Korea TESOL has a long history of presenting venues for the sharing of classroom research that has worked to improve the practices of its members. Second language research in a general sense has been undergoing a methodological reform which has accelerated exponentially over the last ten years. In this presentation, attendees will learn about this methodological reform within quantitative research and how it has manifested itself in what we observe in recent classroom-based research reports. From this overview will emerge several points that readers of these research reports can use to gauge how much stock to put into classroom research reports that might inform their teaching. These points will be presented in an accessible and jargon-free checklist that readers can use to rate a report’s reporting and sample design. Regarding the former, attendees will learn how to identify whether a report’s instruments/measurements have had their validity and reliability considered without the need of technical expertise in the area. Attendees will also learn how to locate and consider how the report has presented the observed effects of the research. Regarding sampling, attendees will learn how issues such as multi-site site sampling, power and sample size planning, and assignment of conditions can be identified and the relevance of such effects. In sum, this presentation works to provide attendees with a tool with which to engage with the research they encounter to inform their practice.

Assessment of Learner and Student Performance in Distance Learning #1046


Sat, Feb 27, 16:30-16:55 JST | Room AS

The new reality created by COVID-19 has caused a lot of changes in the educational sphere. The transition from face-to-face to distance teaching was not smooth in Ukraine because distance learning was not a common practice here before, and teachers were unprepared for teaching online. Therefore, we started our qualitative research primarily to get insights into the altered daily routines of teachers. In particular, we were interested in how teachers assessed their students’ performance online. In this paper, we will focus on secondary school language teachers (n=65) and language tutors at the tertiary level (n=18). The research findings have revealed that teachers gave feedback through different digital applications such as Google Classroom. Oral performance was evaluated either synchronously or asynchronously. The most crucial implication is that teachers should improve and further develop their digital skills and distance teaching and assessing skills in order to provide quality education in the digital world.

Recommendations for Classroom-based TESOL Research: L2 Instructed Vocabulary Acquisition as an Exemplar #1034


Sat, Feb 27, 16:30-17:30 JST | Main Stage

Second language acquisition research (SLA) is in the midst of a methodological reform, particularly within its quantitative domain. This reform has produced a body of work, comprising systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and has resulted in recommendations relating to the practices of SLA researchers. In the spirit of the methodological reform, during this presentation we will discuss research pertaining to an important subfield of SLA, second language instructed vocabulary acquisition (L2 IVA) research, which concerns how target lexical items are learned, specifically in the classroom context, and also the factors influencing the process. The practices of L2 IVA researchers were assessed via the analysis of almost 100 studies published in six journals since the beginning of the 21st century. The results indicated that L2 IVA research will benefit from a more robust approach to sample size planning, and a set of recommendations for future research will be laid out.

Touch the Scraps: Analog Collages and Art Journal in ELT Classrooms #1088


Sat, Feb 27, 16:30-17:50 JST | Room GJ

The pandemic has challenged our patience, balance, and motivation. This workshop is composed of various activities and simple techniques to help us be more resiliant and inspiring when we speak to a class or a group. Social communication skills, drama, and improvisation together with creative writing and free mental association will be important aspects of a workshop that aims to include everybody. The key part will be dedicated to art therapy and collage applied to ELT for children and adults.

Teaching English for Lingua Franca Communication: Korean Speakers and Beyond #1115


Sat, Feb 27, 16:30-17:50 JST | Auxiliary Stage

For most learners and speakers today, English is a language learned predominantly for interaction with other non-native users. We shall discuss how these users adapt and variably alter English ad hoc to suit their communicative purpose, thus preserving their identity without striving to mimic native speakers’ conventions. We will present the results of the first comprehensive analysis of the complete conversation subcomponent of the Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English, focusing on (a) the possible causes of communication breakdowns in ELF communication, and (b) strategies employed by speakers in order to both prevent and overcome such failures. We categorize and show the distribution of the sources of breakdowns as well as the compensatory strategies. These considerations will steer us towards a discussion of the implications for language pedagogy, taking as an example learners who are L1 speakers of Korean, and conclude with recommendations for the translation and interpreting professions.

The How and Why of Our Zoom-ified Future #1070


Sat, Feb 27, 17:00-17:40 JST | Room GK

Jumping head-first into the sudden challenge of adopting Zoom for higher-level national university engineering students, I had to figure out how to apply all the lessons of my two-year post-graduate teaching diploma to ESL in this brave yet potentially abrasive new context. It was sink or swim time--but my informal survey results using Google Forms right after the midterm exam were good; and to my surprise, I was voted best teacher for the semester. A colleague mentioned how that could work against me as students often vote teachers best for letting them leave class early, but that was why it was all so surprising to me: I had often run *overtime* trying to fit too much into the only two hours of contact time per week I shared with each class. What on Earth did I do? Please bring your own questions and/or stories of success and failure using Zoom or other similar synchronous online software to share. This workshop-type session will start with sharing in small groups, move to reviewing within the whole group, and end with a wrap-up as I offer a description reviewing a list of what worked consistently with all my classes, including evidence from students such as quoted comments and scores from evaluation feedback. Questions will be welcome at the start and end of the session.

Korean Film: A Story of Hong Gil Dong (1978) #1179


Sat, Feb 27, 21:00-23:00 JST | Main Stage

The final film we we screen this year is based on another Korean folk tale, Hong Gil Dong. This story tells of the rise of the lowborn Gil Dong, who intelligence, skills, and temperament liken him to another folk hero, Robin Hood. It has been touted as "arguably the single most important work of classic Korean fiction. It has been seen in print, movies, TV shows, novels, and comic books. This cartoon version is excitement for the whole family!

Decolonization, Linguistic Bias, Language Hierarchies, and TESOL #1110


Sun, Feb 28, 09:30-09:55 JST | Room AC

English has been and continues to be a mechanism for colonization and oppression. How, then, can English teachers engage in socially just or decolonizing practices? How can we use TESOL as a mechanism for disrupting rather than perpetuating biases based on language, race/ethnicity, and national origin? In this presentation, we will examine the implications of English's dominance and consider resistance as teaching and learning practice.

Feedforward: Text Response Techniques That Improve Student Writing #1118


Sun, Feb 28, 09:30-09:55 JST | Room DRJ

Teachers spend hours reading, correcting, and giving feedback on learner writing. It is widely perceived as being part of a teacher’s job and a valuable form of language input. But how much do learners understand from teacher responses to texts? What do the learners take away from teacher feedback, and how useful is teacher input on student texts for language learning and writing skills development? If teachers are going to invest time and effort in text response, then it is important to identify what writing feedback techniques are impactful and effective for making the next piece of writing better. This presentation focuses on effective, accessible methods of responding to learner writing, the ideas behind them, and how teachers and students perceive feedback in practice. Quantitative data will show which techniques learners and teachers prefer and why. The session will explore tactics for realizing learning through teacher input on student writing.

A Look at the Social Brain Will Change Your Ideas about ELT Forever #1072


Sun, Feb 28, 10:00-11:00 JST | Main Stage

Through fMRI research, Matthew Lieberman discovered a large network in our brain devoted to figuring out other people's thoughts and intentions: the mentalizing network. The social brain is also important for learning and is active anytime the working memory network, which we use for analytical thinking, is not. Lieberman calls it our Superpower, but he also defines our Kryptonite: traditional education. Educators tend to see the social aspect of learning as a frivolity, or ignore it altogether. For designing rich online classes, synchronous or not, the social brain has much to teach us, from why we experience "Zoom fatigue," why we might advise aspirin for that student that just broke up, to ways to use Dancing Matt to get learners into the right "brain state" for language learning.

Curtis Kelly (EdD.) is a professor at Kansai University, a founder of the JALT BRAIN SIG, and a columnist for the KoTESOL Teaching English Connection. He's a brain nerd. In pursuit of his life mission, "to relieve the suffering of the classroom," he has written numerous textbooks, 30 books, including the Cambridge Writing from Within series.

Teaching Language Classes Online: A Learner’s Perspective #1076


Sun, Feb 28, 11:00-12:00 JST | Main Stage

Many teachers used to doubt that a language class could be taught effectively online. However, a worldwide pandemic has forced language instruction to go online in many parts of the world and we have all seen how some areas of language teaching have changed now. Because of COVID-19, both experienced online teachers and novice online teachers have now had almost a year of real experience teaching English and other languages online. When this is over or when a majority of learners and teachers can go back to a somewhat normal teaching situation again, how might instruction be different?

I am a very experienced language teacher (40 years) and language learner (7 languages). In the past six months, I have also gained another type of experience: I have been an online language learner in an asynchronous university German course.

In this talk, I will offer some interesting and sometimes unexpected insights I gained about online language instruction based on my perspective as a real learner in a real language course that was completely online.

Dr. Keith Folse, Professor of TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages), University of Central Florida, teaches undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral classes. Originally secondary certified in English and French, he has taught English as a Second Language for 40 years in Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, Kuwait, Japan, Spain, and the United States. For the last eleven years, he has also taught online courses, both synchronously and asynchronously.

Dr. Folse is the author of 70 English and teacher education textbooks and is a frequent conference presenter all around the world. His presentations often deal with best teaching practices, vocabulary, grammar, and speaking. He has won numerous teaching and research awards from his university, TESOL International Association, and National Geographic Learning.

Presentation Skills 101 #1067


Sun, Feb 28, 13:00-13:40 JST | Room AS

Presentation skills are a form of public speaking, and skills such as maintaining eye contact and providing effective feedback are important for the classroom. Whether you are a new or a very experienced teacher, everyone can benefit from this workshop. The presentation skills that will be included are eye contact, gestures, body language, vocal variety, clarity, audience awareness and engagement, comfort, filler removal, grammatical variations, speech/presentation planning, and how to evaluate and provide effective feedback. Additional information will be provided on how to continue using these presentation skills in the online setting and how to adjust them appropriately. Using the resources available through the Toastmasters International website, participants will have access to real tips that will help them improve their speaking. After talking about each presentation skill, participants will have the opportunity to practice it with a partner and evaluate each other’s improvement throughout the workshop.

Reimaging the Writing Course Post-COVID #1049


Sun, Feb 28, 13:00-14:20 JST | Room AC

While all teaching is being reevaluated in light of the experiences of going online during COVID, this presentation will focus on the possibilities embedded in writing instruction. The workshop will discuss experiences with a 2nd-year writing course that was taught in multiple sections to students with varying levels of English ability and computer skills through two different learner management systems. We will discuss the problems faced and how they were managed as well as discuss a framework for conceptualizing writing instruction, tying this into current writing pedagogy discussions. While the process has been tailored to the quirks of the Japanese university system and Japanese students, I hope that the workshop format will allow us to collaborate and develop further ideas.

Zoom: Nearly a Perfect EFL Classroom #1064


Sun, Feb 28, 13:00-14:20 JST | Room Gerald

"During the COVID-19 era, Zoom has been viewed by many (if not most) educators as a “temporary” and “inferior” environment to hold classes that until 2020 were always taught in the conventional brick-and-mortar classroom. This workshop will present an alternative view (a “re-envisionment”) – one that not only suggests but urges that Zoom be retained as a permanent fixture in EFL education, especially when it involves adult learners. This workshop will allow attendees to learn new ideas on how to teach speaking skills in the Zoom environment and practice some of these in groups. Participants will also be encouraged to share their own ideas with each other. Most of the strategies discussed will be applicable to all learning contexts, including the regular, traditional brick-and-mortar classroom. It will also be an opportunity to learn about some of the latest EFL research that is occurring in the Zoom context."

Christian Teachers SIG Dialog: Christian Identity and Teaching Critical Thinking #1058


Sun, Feb 28, 13:00-14:30 JST | KOTESOL Room

This dialog, hosted by the KOTESOL Christian Teachers SIG, will challenge participants to articulate their beliefs about Christian identity and teaching critical thinking by answering the following questions in small groups: What is critical thinking? What is the relationship between critical thinking and cross-cultural understanding? What roles do identity and empathy play in critical thinking? Do Christian English teachers have an obligation to teach critical thinking? How might Christian identity affect a teacher's materials and methods for teaching critical thinking? As a follow up to the discussion, participants will be invited to contribute their reflections on Christian identity and teaching critical thinking to the KOTESOL Christian Teachers SIG newsletter.

Korean English Teachers' Experiences of Participating in Long-Term Professional Development for TETE #1002


Sun, Feb 28, 14:00-14:25 JST | Room AS

Teaching English through English (TETE) plays a significant role in promoting English teachers' ability to implement English as a medium of instruction. To promote K-12 English teachers' TETE implementation, the Ministry of Education in Korea has actively promoted a professional development program. This study explored Korean K-12 English teachers' self-efficacy with regard to TETE implementation and their experiences of participating in the long-term professional development (PD) program (six months). Through two surveys, semi-structured interviews, and classroom observations, the data analysis showed that PD could enhance English teachers' self-efficacy in implementing TETE, and the PD site provided a professional learning community for English teachers to reflect on what they had learned from the PD training. However, further data analysis found that self-efficacy and experiences in the PD program were different for elementary and secondary English teachers. Several suggestions are provided in terms of how to effectively prepare K-12 English teachers for TETE implementation through the long-term PD program.

Using Cloud Computing to Improve Feedback about EFL Oral Presentations #1089


Sun, Feb 28, 14:30-14:55 JST | Room AC

In this presentation, I will discuss my experiences fostering a reflective learning environment via (a) the delivery of near-immediate teacher and peer feedback and (b) subsequently requiring students to submit reflections about their learning experiences using cloud computing (G Suite for Education). Certain pedagogical tasks limit teachers’ abilities to provide immediate feedback, such as when students are giving presentations. I will explain how cloud computing can help to overcome such challenges, notably by videoing students, incorporating teacher feedback into the video such that students are receiving critical feedback about their language production and presentation skills, and making it available to them in the cloud. Thereafter, based on students’ comments and their reflective learning assignments, I will discuss (a) whether students were able to understand corrective feedback about use of the -s morpheme (plural -s, third person -s, possessive -s) and (b) whether better usage occurred thereafter (uptake).

Re-thinking Presentation Design Together #1141


Sun, Feb 28, 14:30-15:15 JST | KOTESOL Room

Presentation software is one of the most commonly used tools of instruction in educational technology. At the university level, it is regularly used to display lecture notes and assignments, but as we move down each stage of formal learning, its use tends to gradually decrease. At some schools, the use of technology in the classroom is discouraged or prohibited, and at others, the required equipment may not be readily available or accessible.

When classes were pushed online due to the COVID pandemic, a number of EFL teachers found themselves turning to presentation software —some for the first time in the classroom. Those who were familiar with its use in this setting were at an advantage, but a general desire to use the software creatively to engage students increased, as was evidenced by the teachers who reached out to me for help in designing their lessons. While some EFL teachers may be aware of creative ways in which they can use presentation software, finding design inspiration and moving from concept to creation can be a challenge, especially when their familiarity with the software is not that high.

In this presentation, I will help you re-think presentation design. I will re-introduce you to some of the features available in desktop presentation software, and I will guide you through practical exercises geared at helping you to think creatively about how you can display information on your slides and engage your students. Come prepared to channel your inner creativity!

This presentation is brought to you by the MCALL Special Interest Group

Multimedia and Computer-Assisted Language Learning SIG Sessions #1062


Sun, Feb 28, 14:30-18:00 JST | KOTESOL Room

1. Activating Speaking Skills in Online and Asynchronous Environments, Isobel Hook ("101" workshop, 40 minutes),

Over the past year, many language classes have moved online due to health concerns. Educators and institutions alike have responded to this in a variety of ways, from embracing and encouraging the changes to resistance and insisting that language skills could never be taught online. However, having increased student control over the way a speaking task is conducted allows many students to excel when they would have otherwise floundered.

This presentation will discuss how various class systems and digital tools can be used to encourage active learning and focus on different speaking-associated challenges such as timing, content, and performance anxiety, which can hinder students' active learning. In traditional classrooms, students who struggled with one or more of these elements may have found they struggled with speaking tasks. A wide variety of approaches helps teachers to individually target these elements of speaking while encouraging self-evaluation, accountability, and independence.

2. A New Normal? Reflecting on the Opportunities and Costs of a Year of Mass Remote Learning (

The past 12 months in higher education have brought mass accredited remote learning from an idea to a reality. This workshop will discuss the response to continuing education in the pandemic as one of necessary firefighting or one of a glimpse of a new future. Major questions have been raised about the purpose of higher education, and the role of pedagogy within tertiary learning itself. Some of these questions have been long-term considerations about the changing role of the university in society, while others are fought on the battleground of how educational technology should be utilized within the learning context.

During this workshop, participants will be asked to share their experiences of remote learning, consider what their expectations of tertiary education are, and the lessons that can be learned going forward from 2020.

3. Re-thinking Presentation Design Together, Lisa M. Hunsberger

Presentation software is regularly used at the university level to display lecture notes and assignments, but as we move down each stage of formal learning, its use tends to gradually decrease. When classes were pushed online due to the COVID pandemic, a number of EFL teachers found themselves turning to presentation software —some for the first time in the classroom. While some teachers were aware of the creative ways in which they could use presentation software, finding design inspiration and moving from concept to creation was a challenge.

In this presentation, I will help you re-think presentation design. I will re-introduce some of the features available in desktop presentation software, and I will guide you through practical exercises geared at helping you to think creatively about how you can display information on a slide and engage your students. Come prepared to channel your inner creativity!

4. A New Normal? Reflecting on the Opportunities and Costs of a Year of Mass Remote Learning, Michael Brandon (Workshop, 80 minutes)

5. Innovative Assessment Practices, Victor Reeser (Workshop, 40 minutes)

While there are more online and digital teaching resources available to educators today than ever before, fossilized teaching practices and institutional restrictions often lead to oversimplification of assessment practices to the detriment of our students. This workshop will discuss traditional assessment practices, including their purpose and metrics, and explore research-backed methods of evolving assessment to meet the needs of today’s English-language learners (ELLs). By establishing standards-based assessments and utilizing tools such as skill inventories, reporting forms, and comments, educators can accurately measure student progress and adapt their lessons to meet individual needs. The efficacy of practices such as accepting late work and allowing students to resubmit work will also be discussed. Attendees can expect an engaging and thoughtful discussion on the topic and should be prepared to participate.

The past 12 months in higher education have brought mass accredited remote learning from an idea to a reality. This workshop will discuss the response to continuing education in the pandemic as one of necessary firefighting or one of a glimpse of a new future. Major questions have been raised about the purpose of higher education, and the role of pedagogy within tertiary learning itself. Some of these questions have been long-term considerations about the changing role of the university in society, while others are fought on the battleground of how educational technology should be utilized within the learning context.

During this workshop, participants will be asked to share their experiences of remote learning, consider what their expectations of tertiary education are, and the lessons that can be learned going forward from 2020.

Activating Speaking Skills in Online and Asynchronous Environments #1142


Sun, Feb 28, 15:15-16:00 JST | KOTESOL Room

Over the past year, many educators have seen classes move online due to health concerns. Educators and institutions alike have responded to this in a variety of ways, from embracing and encouraging the changes to resistance and insisting that language skills could never be taught online. However, this move to distance learning is neither new nor revolutionary. Distance education has been used for decades and is an increasingly popular alternative for learners who are unable to attend traditional institutes for a variety of reasons. In fact, having increased control over a speaking task's pace, environment, time, topic, direction and amount of preparation allows many students to excel when they would have otherwise floundered.

This presentation will discuss how various class systems and digital tools can be used to encourage active learning and focus on different speaking-associated challenges. In this context, active learning is defined as students who are engaged with the materials via both their knowledge of the language and through social connections. The ability to speak in another language is affected by several elements such as pronunciation, timed output, content and clarity, receiving and responding, and performance anxiety, all of which can hinder students' active learning. In traditional classrooms, students who struggled with one or more of these elements may have found they were unable to complete speaking tasks to the best of their ability or participate at all. Using a wide variety of tools and approaches, teachers are able to individually target these elements of speaking and encourage student self-evaluation, accountability, and independence.

Instead of fearing that increased distance learning will result in the devaluation of English teachers, we should instead use our skills and knowledge to improve the quality of teaching and keep moving forward with the times. Creating spaces and materials for active learning allows students to define their needs and challenges and allows for students with a wider range of skills to succeed in speaking tasks.

This presentation is brought to you by the MCALL Special Interest Group

Reflection on Practice with Figures of Speech #998


Sun, Feb 28, 15:30-16:10 JST | Room JB

Reflective practice can be valuable for improving our work and can take on many forms. While reflection-in-action may be a bit taxing, reflection-on-action might be more cathartic, especially if it involves a little play. That’s where figures of speech come in. These stylistic ways of using language involve creative expression and meaning-making that can be fun to reflect on practice! Thus, after briefly reviewing figures of speech and defining a select few, participants in this interactive workshop will whip up their own batch of examples related to their teaching, learning, and/or research to share and contemplate together. It is hoped that this exchange will also lead to reflection-for-action.

TOEIC Speaking Tasks for Building Communicative Competence in the Classroom #1018


Sun, Feb 28, 15:30-16:10 JST | Room RR

Integrating TOEIC material in the classroom can be difficult due to varying goals, needs, expectations, and knowledge about the test. This workshop will give basic background about the TOEIC Speaking tasks and show teachers ways to adapt these tasks for use in their communicative classroom as classroom activities and assessment tasks. The presenter will draw on his experience both with ETS and in the classroom to share practical ideas that will give students TOEIC Speaking practice while not straying from the communicative activities that they already do in the classroom. Teachers will leave the workshop with ideas to create tasks that focus on pronunciation and prosody, basic grammar and vocabulary, synthesizing and responding to oral and visual information, and expressing and supporting ideas.

Preparing University Learners for Academic Writing in English #1028


Sun, Feb 28, 16:00-16:25 JST | Room JT

Most second language learners arrive at university having had little writing tuition at high schools beforehand. Writing thus represents a steep learning curve for these learners. Furthermore, there are significant differences between those in their first or final year; from coherency and paragraph construction in their first year through to academic dissertations in their final year. This presentation will describe a method to help second-year university learners construct an academic text. This approach incorporates both process and product approaches. While specific creative stages utilize the process cycle of self-reflection, production, feedback, and rewriting, other stages are better served by incorporating an ideal for learners to work toward. Both constraints and benefits of this blended approach will be described in this presentation.

A New Normal? Reflecting on the Opportunities and Costs of a Year of Mass Remote Learning #1143


Sun, Feb 28, 16:00-17:20 JST | KOTESOL Room

In response to the pandemic crisis, the Korean Ministry of Education had to create a universal response to ensure the standardized quality of the Korean higher education system, and to allow enrolled students to continue their studies. Using a set of measures for recorded and live classes these rigid rules provided some assurance that a set of standards could be maintained, a key factor considering the peninsula’s growing dependence on overseas students. Almost one year on, as a new academic year prepares to roll out on-line, do these measures provide a glimpse of an online future of higher education, or do they remain a set of necessary measures ready for lifting once the pandemic eases? There has been long-term discussion on what university actually means in the modern world, as higher education and institutions have shifted from small scale centres of scholarship to large scale global centres of learning. How learning should take place within higher education is a pressing issue brought even more to the fore by concerns on integrating educational technology and new pedagogies in a more digitized era. Has the experience of remote learning highlighted the importance of well-rounded and contextualized pedagogy, or has it exposed limits and weaknesses in tertiary learning? This workshop considers the pedagogical implications of the past 12 months, the economic factors involved, and the teleological issues at the heart of online learning. It will offer discussion sessions for sharing the experiences of the past 12 months and build up a reflective framework for participants to consider the purpose and goals of what is taking place within the remote learning space and what lessons can be learned and applied going forward.

This presentation is brought to you by the MCALL Special Interest Group.

How Student Teachers Appropriate Communicative Teaching Ideas from Reflective Dialogue #1105


Sun, Feb 28, 16:30-16:55 JST | Room JB

Post-lesson reflections are a staple of TESOL practicums to promote professional development. But we know little about how reflections with supervisors help student teachers appropriate ideas to develop their emerging practice. This paper presentation addresses this knowledge gap through a qualitative study of the recorded post-lesson reflections of four Chinese student teachers that I supervised in an American TESOL practicum. Analysis focuses on how we sought solutions to problems of practice that interfered with student communication. It identifies ideas that we discussed and then traces how student teachers appropriated these ideas for implementation in successive lessons. The study finds that the student teachers needed supervisor assistance in identifying problems that interfered with student communication and that this assistance proceeded through stages of dialogue. Analysis identifies how student teachers exercised two principle dialogical moves that worked to change conceptions of TESOL practice and drive appropriation of new ideas for CLT implementation.

Teaching Presentation Skills Online: A Case Study #1014


Sun, Feb 28, 16:30-16:55 JST | Room SP

This study aimed to help improve students’ public speaking skills, which is a graduation requirement at International University. A total of 44 intermediate-level students were selected, and a mixed model with a pre-test, a post-test, and observation was applied. In addition to the lecturer’s input and tips, the experimental students benefited from cooperative learning and technology applications. Also, they were required to video-record their homework presentations and give feedback and suggestions on other presentations based on a checklist provided. Google Drive was recommended to give students easy access to sample presentations for reflections and self-improvement. After the eight-week treatment, results from the pre-test and post-test revealed that students in the experimental group achieved better scores on their presentations in terms of organization and visual aids and minor improvement in pronunciation, lexical usage, and grammatical usage. This sheds light on an alternative for teaching public speaking online.

Sustainable Extensive Reading Programs: Approach, Strategies, Resources, Techniques #1082


Sun, Feb 28, 16:30-17:50 JST | Room JT

The aim of this workshop is to support participants in setting up and implementing extensive reading (ER) components in the courses they teach. Extensive reading, defined as reading for overall meaning, information, pleasure, and enjoyment, has been proven by research to enhance reading speed and fluency, writing skills, and overall language knowledge. Research findings also indicate that although ESL and EFL teachers may have positive views on the effectiveness of ER and may be motivated to implement an ER component in the classes they teach, they may be reluctant to do so. Workshop participants will initially contribute their experiences of implementing ER in their context. Subsequently, they will be presented with an ER approach utilizing free resources available online, including implementation examples of the approach and strategies and techniques to link an ER component with the intended learning outcomes of various foreign language programs. The workshop will end with group work on the topic.

What Do They Expect? A Survey of Freshman Taking Online English Classes #1071


Sun, Feb 28, 17:00-17:25 JST | Room SP

How can we achieve student "buy in" with our online teaching methods? What do they expect the online classroom to look like? This presentation discusses the results of a survey given to university freshmen in their first semester of online classes. They answered questions about their access to online classes and the professor's teaching methods and feedback along with classmate interaction. We aim to look at online classes from the student's perspective in order to make a connection with them in a virtual setting.

Online Contents Are Power. You Want the Power #1086


Sun, Feb 28, 17:00-17:40 JST | Room GJ

You’re surrounded by content in all these forms whenever you’re online (and also offline sometimes). It’s not simply a matter of choosing a cool new video or an interesting image in a smart Instagram account or on Pinterest. It's all about your purposes. Images are fundamental in our contemporary world. We'll have a practical, precise taste of challenging visual literacy for teachers and learners.

Foreign Language Teachers and Learners in the Face of COVID-19 #1114


Sun, Feb 28, 17:30-17:55 JST | Room SP

We present the findings of a global longitudinal study (involving over 6,000 participants from 118 countries) investigating how language teachers and learners as well as linguistics instructors and students were handling the 2020 transition to emergency remote instruction. We will present the meaningful relationships between mutually interacting variables, including sociodemographics (gender, age, education level handled, prior experience with online instruction), circumstances and logistics (economic status of the country, life circumstances, infections among family and friends, level of support), attitudes, behaviors, psychological states, and personality traits (including coping, engagement, and well-being). The significant, sometimes non-trivial findings offer valuable guidance for prevention and training, both during the ongoing pandemic and in possible future shifts to emergency remote teaching and learning.

Innovative Assessment Practices #1144


Sun, Feb 28, 17:30-18:20 JST | KOTESOL Room

While there are more online and digital teaching resources available to educators today than ever before, fossilized teaching practices and institutional restrictions often lead to oversimplification of assessment practices to the detriment of our students. This workshop will discuss traditional assessment practices, including their purpose and metrics, and explore research-backed methods of evolving assessment to meet the needs of today’s English-language learners (ELLs). By establishing standards-based assessments and utilizing tools such as skill inventories, reporting forms, and comments, educators can accurately measure student progress and adapt their lessons to meet individual needs. The efficacy of practices such as accepting late work and allowing students to resubmit work will also be discussed. Attendees can expect an engaging and thoughtful discussion on the topic and should be prepared to participate.